ordinance

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English (ca. 1300), from Old French ordenance (Modern French ordonnance) "decree, command", from Middle Latin ordinantia, from ordinans, the present participle of Latin ordinare "put in order" (whence ordain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɔːd.nənts/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹd.nəns/, /ˈɔɹ.dɪ.nəns/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ordinance (plural ordinances)

  1. A local law, an edict or decree.
    1. (England) Prior to the Third English Civil War, a decree of Parliament.
    2. (Britain, pre-1992 universities, Commonwealth of Nations) Detailed legislation that translates the broad principles of the university's charter and statutes into practical effect.
  2. A religious practice or ritual prescribed by the church.

Usage notes[edit]

This word is sometimes confused with ordnance, or military weaponry.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]