order

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ordre, from Old French ordre, ordne, ordene (order, rank), from Latin ōrdinem, accusative of ōrdō (row, rank, regular arrangement, literally row of threads in a loom), from Proto-Italic *ored-, *oreð- (to arrange), of unknown origin. Related to Latin ōrdior (begin, literally begin to weave). In sense “request for purchase”, compare bespoke. Doublet of ordo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

order (countable and uncountable, plural orders)

Illustrations of the Classical orders (from left to right): Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite, made in 1728 (sense 14)
  1. (countable) Arrangement, disposition, or sequence.
    put the children in age order
    It's arranged in order of frequency
  2. (countable) A position in an arrangement, disposition, or sequence.
    • 1843, New York (State). Natural History Survey, Geology of New-York: Comprising the survey of the fourth geological ...:
      In these situations we find the Genesee slate, the Tully limestone and the upper part of the Hamilton group, each one in its order disappearing beneath the lake level as we proceed southward.
    • 1856, George Nicholls, A History of the Irish Poor Law: In Connexion with the Condition of the People:
      In the latter portion of this period, the country was assailed by famine and pestilence - — a fearful visitation which will be noticed hereafter in its order of date, and of which it would be out of place to say more at present.
    • 1897, T. L. Heath (translator), Eutocius of Ascalon, Extract from a commentary by Eutocius, quoted in 1897 [CUP], T. L. Heath (editor), The Works of Archimedes, 2002, Dover, unnumbered page,
      His attempt I shall also give in its order.
    • 1915, Edwin Abbott Abbott, the fourfold gospel the proclamation of the new kingdom, page 298:
      This narrative must be discussed later on, in its order.
    • 1996, John Clare, Eric Robinson, David Powell, John Clare: Poems of the Middle Period, 1822-1837, page xxxi:
      The latter comes into play only as we examine each word in its order in the line.
    • 2013, Leah Sarat, Fire in the Canyon: Religion, Migration, and the Mexican Dream:
      Hasn't it been shown that the Hebrew letter “w” is equivalent to the number 6, due to its order in the alphabet, he asked?
    • 2014, Julia Navarro, Tell Me Who I Am:
      Because Professor Soler told me that you had to investigate things step by step, that you had to find a thread to follow and follow it, and find everything out in its order.
  3. (uncountable) The state of being well arranged.
    The house is in order; the machinery is out of order.
  4. (countable) Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet.
    to preserve order in a community or an assembly
    Order in the court!
  5. (countable) A command.
    give an order
    his inability to follow orders
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 30, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      It was by his order the shattered leading company flung itself into the houses when the Sin Verguenza were met by an enfilading volley as they reeled into the calle.
  6. (countable) A request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.
    make an order
    receive an online order for the new range of sunglasses
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist[2], volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer.
  7. (countable) A group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles.
    St. Ignatius Loyola founded the Jesuit order in 1537.
  8. (countable) An association of knights.
    the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Bath.
  9. Any group of people with common interests.
  10. (countable) A decoration, awarded by a government, a dynastic house, or a religious body to an individual, usually for distinguished service to a nation or to humanity.
  11. (countable, biology, taxonomy) A category in the classification of organisms, ranking below class and above family; a taxon at that rank.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
    The magnolia and nutmeg families belong to the order Magnoliales.
  12. A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a distinct character, kind, or sort.
    the higher or lower orders of society
    talent of a high order
  13. (Christianity) An ecclesiastical rank or position, usually for the sake of ministry, (especially, when plural) holy orders.
    Their have been many major and minor orders in the history of Christianity: the order of virgins, of deacons, priests, lectors, acolytes, porters, catechists, widows, etc.
    to take orders or holy orders means to be ordained a deacon or priest
  14. (architecture) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (since the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural design.
  15. (cricket) The sequence in which a side’s batsmen bat; the batting order.
  16. (electronics) A power of polynomial function in an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
    a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter
  17. (chemistry) The overall power of the rate law of a chemical reaction, expressed as a polynomial function of concentrations of reactants and products.
  18. (set theory) The cardinality, or number of elements in a set, group, or other structure regardable as a set.
    • 1911 [Cambridge University Press], William Burnside, Theory of Groups of Finite Order, 2nd Edition, Reprint, Dover (Dover Phoenix), 2004, page 222,
      In this case, the conjugate set contains n(n − 1)/x(x − 1) distinct sub-groups of order m, and H is therefore self-conjugate in a group K of order x(x − l)m.
    • 2000, Michael Aschbacher, Finite Group Theory, Cambridge University Press, 2nd Edition, page 260,
      For various reasons it turns out to be better to enlarge this set of invariants to include suitable normalizers of subgroups of odd prime order.
  19. (group theory, of an element of a group) For given group G and element gG, the smallest positive natural number n, if it exists, such that (using multiplicative notation), gn = e, where e is the identity element of G; if no such number exists, the element is said to be of infinite order (or sometimes zero order).
    • 1997, Frank Celler, C. R. Leedham-Green, Calculating the Order of an Invertible Matrix, Larry Finkelstein, William M. Kantor (editors), Groups and Computation II, American Mathematical Society, page 55,
      The object of this note is to observe that it is possible to calculate the order of an element of on average using field operations, assuming that has been factorised for .
    • 1999, A. Ehrenfeucht, T. Harju, G. Rozenberg, The Theory of 2-structures, World Scientific, page 15,
      If is a finite group, its cardinality is called the order of . The order of an element is defined as the smallest nonnegative integer such that . The second case of the following result is known as Cauchy's theorem.
      Theorem 1.10 Let be a finite group.
      (i) The order of an element divides the order of the group.
      (ii) If a prime number divides , then there exists an element of order .
    • 2010, A. R. Vasishta, A. K. Vasishta, Modern Algebra, Krishna Prakashan Media, 60th Edition, page 180,
      Since in a finite group the order of an element must be a divisor of the order of the group, therefore o (a) cannot be 3 and so we must have o (a)=4=the order of the group G.
  20. (graph theory) The number of vertices in a graph.
  21. (order theory) A partially ordered set.
  22. (order theory) The relation on a partially ordered set that determines that it is, in fact, a partially ordered set.
  23. (algebra) The sum of the exponents on the variables in a monomial, or the highest such among all monomials in a polynomial.
    A quadratic polynomial, is said to be of order (or degree) 2.
  24. (finance) A written direction to furnish someone with money or property; compare money order, postal order.
    • 1763, James Boswell, in Gordon Turnbull (ed.), London Journal 1762–1763, Penguin 2014, p. 233:
      I then walked to Cochrane's & got an order on Sir Charles Asgill for my money.

Quotations[edit]

  • 1611, Bible, King James Version, Luke, 1:i:
    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us [] .
  • 1973, Donald Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 3: Sorting and Searching, Addison-Wesley, chapter 8:
    Since only two of our tape drives were in working order, I was ordered to order more tape units in short order, in order to order the data several orders of magnitude faster.

Synonyms[edit]

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Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Verb[edit]

order (third-person singular simple present orders, present participle ordering, simple past and past participle ordered)

  1. (transitive) To set in some sort of order.
    We need to order them alphabetically.
  2. (transitive) To arrange, set in proper order.
    The books in the shelf need ordering.
  3. (transitive) To issue a command to.
    to order troops to advance
    He ordered me to leave.
    I hate being ordered around by my co-workers.
  4. (transitive) To request some product or service; to secure by placing an order.
    You can now order most products to be delivered to your home.
    to order groceries
  5. To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.

Conjugation[edit]

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Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French ordre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔr.dər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: or‧der

Noun[edit]

order m or f or n (plural orders)

  1. order (command)
  2. order (request for product or service)

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

order

  1. inflection of ordern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch order, from from Old French ordre, ordne, ordene (order, rank), from Latin ōrdinem, accusative of ōrdō (row, rank, regular arrangement, literally row of threads in a loom). Doublet of orde and ordo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɔr.dər]
  • Hyphenation: or‧dêr

Noun[edit]

ordêr (plural, first-person possessive orderku, second-person possessive ordermu, third-person possessive ordernya)

  1. order,
    1. a command.
    2. a request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.
      Synonym: pesanan

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Old French ordre, ordne, ordene (order, rank), from Latin ōrdinem, accusative of ōrdō (row, rank, regular arrangement, literally row of threads in a loom).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

order m inan (diminutive orderek, augmentative orderzysko)

  1. order (decoration awarded by government or other authority)
    Synonym: odznaczenie

Declension[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

  • order in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • order in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

order c

  1. an order; a command
  2. an order; a request for some product or service

Declension[edit]

Declension of order 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative order ordern order orderna
Genitive orders orderns orders ordernas

Hyponyms[edit]

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