nun

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See also: Nun, nún, nùn, ñun, Nun., and ن

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English nunne(nun, priestess), from Late Latin nonna(nun, tutor), originally (along with masculine form nonnus(man)) a term of address for elderly persons, perhaps from children's speech, reminiscent of nana, like papa etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nun ‎(plural nuns)

  1. A member of a Christian religious community of women who live by certain vows and usually wear a habit, in some cases living together in a cloister.
  2. By extension, member of a similar female community in other confessions.
  3. (archaic, British slang) A prostitute.[1]
    • 1770, Foote, Samuel, The Lame Lover[2], page 12:
      Then lend me your ear—Why last night, as Colonel Kill'em, Sir William Weezy, Lord Frederick Foretop, and I were carelessly sliding the Ranelagh round, picking our teeth, after a damn'd muzzy dinner at Boodle's, who should trip by but an abbess, well known about town, with a smart little nun in her suite.
    • 1881, Egan, Pierce, chapter 8, in Life in London[3], page 205:
      "I mean to inform you," answered the Oxonian, with a grin on his face, "that those three nymphs, who have so much dazzled your optics, are three nuns, and the plump female is Mother .... of great notoriety [...]"
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Semitic *nūn-(fish).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nun ‎(plural nuns)

  1. The fourteenth letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads (Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and others).
Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Farmer, John Stephen (1902) Slang and Its Analogues[1], volume 5, page 76
  • nun” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin nōn.

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. not, no (used to make negatives)

Etymology 2[edit]

Contraction[edit]

nun

  1. in a/an (contraction of en + un)

Chiricahua[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • non (in older Americanist literature)

Etymology[edit]

Cognates: Navajo nooʼ, Western Apache non, noi, Plains Apache nǫǫ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nun

  1. grave, burial place
  2. cache

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

German nun.

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. now

Derived terms[edit]


Fala[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. Alternative form of non

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition en(in) + masculine article un(a, one)

Contraction[edit]

nun m ‎(feminine nunha, masculine plural nuns, feminine plural nunhas)

  1. in a, in one

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • nu (colloquial; otherwise archaic)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German nu, nū, nuo with a secondary final -n, already occasionally in Middle High German nuon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. now, then; expressing a logical or temporal consequence
    Wir haben abgewaschen, nun müssen wir noch abtrocknen.
    We've washed up, now we must dry [the dishes].
    Was bedeuten nun die geschilderten Entwicklungen für unser Land?
    Now what do the aforementioned developments mean for our country?
  2. unstressed and expletive, used for minor emphasis
    Was soll das nun heißen?
    What's that supposed to mean now?

Usage notes[edit]

  • Although the adverb is similar and akin to English “now”, German nun is not commonly used in a strictly temporal sense, meaning “at this moment”. For that, see jetzt.

Interjection[edit]

nun

  1. now, well, so
    Nun, das ist eine schwierige Frage.
    Well, that's a tough question.

Hausa[edit]

Noun[edit]

nun f

  1. Arabic letter nun (ن)

Ido[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. now

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

nun

  1. rafsi of nu.

Mirandese[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. not

Novial[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nun

  1. now

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See nom.

Noun[edit]

nun m ‎(oblique plural nuns, nominative singular nuns, nominative plural nun)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of nom

Etymology 2[edit]

Reduced from of negun.

Adjective[edit]

nun m ‎(oblique and nominative feminine singular nune)

  1. Alternative form of negun

Pronoun[edit]

nun

  1. Alternative form of negun

Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

nun

  1. salt

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin nonnus.

Noun[edit]

nun m ‎(plural nuni, feminine equivalent nună)

  1. the godfather at a wedding

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic نُون(nūn).

Noun[edit]

nun

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: ن
    • Previous: م
    • Next: و

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

nun ‎(plural nuns)

  1. message

Declension[edit]