abbot

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See also: Abbot

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English abbot, abbod, abbed, from Old English abbat, abbad, abbod, from Latin abbās (father), from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא(’abbā, father). Doublet of abba, abbé, bwana.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abbot (plural abbots)

  1. The superior or head of an abbey or monastery. [First attested around the early 12th century.][1][2]
    The newly appointed abbot decided to take a tour of the abbey with the cardinal's emissary.
  2. A layman who received the abbey's revenues, after the closing of the monasteries.
  3. (archaic, British slang) A brothel-owner's husband or lover.[3][4]
  4. (archaic, British slang) A ponce; a man employed by a prostitute to find clients, and who may also act as a bodyguard or equivalent to a bouncer.[3][4]

Derived terms[edit]

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Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], →ISBN), page 2
  2. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], →ISBN), page 3
  3. 3.0 3.1 “abbot” in Albert Barrère and Charles G[odfrey] Leland, compilers and editors, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, volume I (A–K), Edinburgh: The Ballantyne Press, 1889–1890, page 3.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Farmer, John Stephen (1890) Slang and Its Analogues[1], volume 1, pages 4
  • Webster 1913

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish abbot, from Latin abbās, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא(’abbā, father).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abbot c

  1. an abbot

Declension[edit]

Declension of abbot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative abbot abboten abbotar abbotarna
Genitive abbots abbotens abbotars abbotarnas

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