lover

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See also: løver and Lover

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lovere, luffer, lufere, equivalent to love +‎ -er.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • lovyer (dialectal or obsolete)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lover (plural lovers)

  1. One who loves and cares for another person in a romantic way; a sweetheart, love, soulmate, boyfriend, girlfriend or spouse.
    Synonyms: love, love interest, spouse, sweetheart, significant other; see also Thesaurus:lover
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene vi], page 170, column 2:
      [] loue is blinde, and louers cannot ſee / The pretty follies that themſelues commit, []
    • 1976, Joni Mitchell (lyrics and music), “Song For Sharon”, in Hejira:
      Well there's a wide wide world of noble causes / And lovely landscapes to discover / But all I really want to do right now / Is find another lover
    • 2016, David Boulter; Stuart A. Staples (lyrics and music), “Like Only Lovers Can”, in The Waiting Room, performed by Tindersticks:
      We can only hurt each other the way that lovers can / So where do we go, where do we hide now?
  2. A sexual partner, especially one with whom someone is having an affair.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:sexual partner
    • 2018 January 17, "Libra Woman: Personality Traits: Love & More", Astrology.com [1]
      A Libra woman seems to always be in love - either with her long term partner or with an ever-changing series of rotating lovers.
  3. A person who loves something.
    Synonym: connoisseur
    a lover of fine wines
    a lover of his/her own country
  4. (West Country, with "my") An informal term of address for any friend.
    All right, me lover?
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • German: Lover
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

lover (plural lovers)

  1. Obsolete form of louver.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch lover, originally the plural of loof. As with other words with plurals in -er, eventually this was substituted with -eren, creating loveren. This new plural was then reanalysed as a separate noun and a new singular form lover was back-formed from it.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lover n (plural lovers, diminutive lovertje n)

  1. foliage

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A 17th century borrowing from North Sea Germanic language verb "lofen, lufen". The 1986 Dictionnaire de l'Académie française identifies the source as Low German (Dutch Low Saxon or German Low German); Jan de Vries' Nederlands Etymologisch Woordenboek (which identifies it as a possible cognate of Dutch leuver) suggests East Frisian instead.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lover

  1. to coil (a rope or cord), to fake a line
  2. (reflexive, of a snake) to coil up, wind up; to curl up

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lover (plural lovers)

  1. lover

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

lover m pl

  1. indefinite masculine plural of lov

Verb[edit]

lover

  1. present tense of love

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lover f pl

  1. indefinite feminine plural of lov

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lover

  1. present of lova