fan

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Contents

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Handheld fans
An electrical fan
A Ceiling fan

From Middle English fan, from Old English fann ‎(a winnowing, fan), from Latin vannus ‎(fan for winnowing grain), from Proto-Indo-European wē- ‎(to blow). Cognate with Latin ventus ‎(wind), Dutch wan ‎(fan), German Wanne, Swedish vanna ‎(a fan for winnowing), Old English windwian ‎(to fan, winnow). More at winnow.

Noun[edit]

fan ‎(plural fans)

  1. A hand-held device consisting of concertinaed material, or slats of material, gathered together at one end, that may be opened out into the shape of a sector of a circle and waved back and forth in order to move air towards oneself and cool oneself.
  2. An electrical device for moving air, used for cooling people, machinery, etc.
  3. Anything resembling a hand-held fan in shape, e.g., a peacock’s tail.
  4. An instrument for winnowing grain, by moving which the grain is tossed and agitated, and the chaff is separated and blown away.
  5. A small vane or sail, used to keep the large sails of a smock windmill always in the direction of the wind.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

fan ‎(third-person singular simple present fans, present participle fanning, simple past and past participle fanned)

  1. (transitive) To blow air on (something) by means of a fan (hand-held, mechanical or electrical) or otherwise.
    We enjoyed standing at the edge of the cliff, being fanned by the wind..
  2. (transitive) To slap (a behind, especially).
  3. (intransitive, usually to fan out) To move or spread in multiple directions from one point, in the shape of a hand-held fan.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Football/soccer fans in Argentina.

Shortened from fanatic.

Noun[edit]

fan ‎(plural fans or fen)

  1. An admirer or aficionado, especially of a sport or performer; someone who is fond of something or someone; an admirer.
    I am a big fan of libraries.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of fer

Chuukese[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan

  1. church (building)
    Ka mochen fiti fan? ― Do you want to attend church?
  2. time (instance or occurrence)
    • 2010, Ewe Kapasen God, United Bible Societies, ISBN 9781920714000, Matthew 26:34, page 55:
      Jesus a apasa ngeni Peter, "Upwe apasa ngonuk pwe non ei chok pwinin me mwen ewe chukȯ epwe kökkö, fan unungat kopwe apasa pwe kose sinei ei."
      Jesus said to Peter, "I tell you that in this night before the chicken calls, three times you will say that you don't know me."

Preposition[edit]

fan

  1. under

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan m ‎(plural fans, diminutive fannetje n)

  1. fan (admirer)

Synonyms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan

  1. fan, admirer, aficionado

Declension[edit]

Inflection of fan (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative fan fanit
genitive fanin fanien
partitive fania faneja
illative faniin faneihin
singular plural
nominative fan fanit
accusative nom.? fan fanit
gen. fanin
genitive fanin fanien
partitive fania faneja
inessive fanissa faneissa
elative fanista faneista
illative faniin faneihin
adessive fanilla faneilla
ablative fanilta faneilta
allative fanilleˣ faneilleˣ
essive fanina faneina
translative faniksi faneiksi
instructive fanein
abessive fanitta faneitta
comitative faneineen

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From fanatique.

Noun[edit]

fan m, f ‎(plural fans)

  1. fan (admirer, supporter)

Noun[edit]

fan f ‎(plural fans)

  1. (Canada) fan (ventilator)

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin famēs.

Noun[edit]

fan f

  1. hunger

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of facer

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan ‎(plural fanok)

  1. (obsolete) pubis

Usage notes[edit]

Today it is used only in compounds.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • fan at A Pallas Nagy Lexikona, Pallas Irodalmi és Nyomdai Rt., Budapest, 1897
  • László Országh, Hungarian-English Dictionary, Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1977

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish anaid, fanaid ‎(stays, remains, abides).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fan ‎(present analytic fanann, future analytic fanfaidh, verbal noun fanacht, past participle fanta)

  1. to wait
  2. to stay

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fan fhan bhfan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fāmes.

Noun[edit]

fan

  1. hunger

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English

Noun[edit]

fan m, f ‎(plural fans)

  1. fan (admirer or follower)

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

fan

  1. rafsi of falnu.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

fan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of fàn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Occitan[edit]

Verb[edit]

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of faire

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fana, *funa ‎(from), from Proto-Indo-European *pone, *pana ‎(from), from Proto-Indo-European *apo-, *pā- ‎(off, of). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan ‎(from), Old Frisian fan, fon ‎(from), Old High German fona, fon ‎(from).

Preposition[edit]

fan

  1. off, from

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: van

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *afana, whence also Old High German fon.

Preposition[edit]

fon

  1. from

Rohingya[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan

  1. betel leaf

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish anaid, fanaid ‎(stays, remains, abides).

Verb[edit]

fan ‎(past dh'fhan, future fanaidh, verbal noun fantail or fantainn or fanachd)

  1. stay, remain
  2. wait

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan m, f ‎(plural fans)

  1. fan

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Old Norse fendinn, perhaps from Old Frisian fandiand, present participle of fandia ‎(tempt), from Proto-Germanic *fandōną ‎(seek, search for, examine).

Noun[edit]

fan c

  1. the devil, Satan
    fan ta dig.
    May the devil take you.
    Du var mig en jobbig fan.
    You're one tricky little devil.

Interjection[edit]

fan

  1. damn (referring to the devil)
    Fan! Jag glömde nycklarna.
    Damn! I forgot my keys.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan c, n

  1. fan (admirer)
    jag är ett stort fan av saffransbullar
    I'm a huge fan of saffron buns
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan n

  1. vane, web (part of the anatomy of a bird's feather)
Declension[edit]

Uzbek[edit]

Uzbek Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia uz

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فَنّ ‎(fann)

Noun[edit]

fan ‎(plural fanlar)

  1. science

Synonyms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan f (plural faniau)

  1. van
Mutation[edit]
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
fan fan fan fan

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

fan

  1. Soft mutation form of man
Mutation[edit]
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
man fan unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Frisian fen; compare Dutch van, German von

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

fan

  1. from
  2. of