wan

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A wan moon (sense 1) rising over snow-covered mountains

From Middle English wan, wanne (grey, leaden; pale grey, ashen; blue-black (like a bruise); dim, faint; dark, gloomy), from Old English ƿann (dark, dusky),[1] from Proto-Germanic *wannaz (dark, swart), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Old Frisian wann, wonn (dark).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

wan (comparative wanner, superlative wannest)

  1. Pale, sickly-looking.
  2. Dim, faint.
    • 1909, Robert W[illiam] Service, “The Ballad of One-eyed Mike”, in Ballads of a Cheechako, Toronto, Ont.: William Briggs, OCLC 2068144, page 52:
      ’Twas so far away, that evil day when I prayed the Prince of Gloom / For the savage strength and the sullen length of life to work his doom. / Nor sign nor word had I seen or heard, and it happed so long ago; / My youth was gone and my memory wan, and I willed it even so.
  3. Bland, uninterested.
    A wan expression
    • 1867 July 13, “Lieutenant Castagnac”, in Every Saturday: A Journal of Choice Reading, Selected from Foreign Current Literature, volume IV, number 80, Cambridge, Mass.: Printed at the University Press, Cambridge, by Welch, Bigelow, & Co., for Ticknor and Fields, OCLC 123899278, chapter II, page 35:
      My position in the midst of the general indifference was hard to bear ; my silence weighed upon me like remorse. The sight of Lieutenant Castagnac filled me with indignation, — a sort of insurmountable repulsion: the wan look, the ironical smile of the man, froze my blood.
    • 2013, Carter Dreyfuss, chapter 1, in The Prince of Temple Square: A Murder Mystery, Tucson, Ariz.: Wheatmark, →ISBN, pages 8–9:
      Checking out her brother’s khakis, the gun propped in the corner, Olivia’s hiking boots and her wan expression, she wants to laugh. “Been hunting, I see.” Olivia’s face falls, as expected. Her brother’s obsession with guns and gross little expeditions appall her.
    • 2014, Chris Angus, chapter 12, in Flypaper: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Yucca Publishing, Skyhorse Publishing, →ISBN:
      “I have to admit, I’ve been tempted a time or two to chuck everything to go live in a place like this [Bogda Peak, China],” he replied. / “What stopped you?” / He gave her a wan look. “Celibacy.”
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

wan (uncountable)

  1. The quality of being wan; wanness.

Etymology 2[edit]

Eye dialect spelling of one. Sense 2 (“girl or woman”) possibly as a result of the phrase your wan as a counterpart to your man.

Noun[edit]

wan (plural wans)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of one, representing Ireland English.
  2. (Ireland) A girl or woman.
    • 1993, Elaine Crowley, The Ways Of Women, London: Orion, →ISBN:
      Then I’d tell myself there were plenty of oul wans and oul fellas in work who never got it and that I’d be lucky like them and escape. Only I didn’t. I don’t want to die.
    • 2005, David McWilliams, The Pope’s Children: Ireland’s New Elite, Dublin: Gill & Macmillan, →ISBN; republished as The Pope’s Children: The Irish Economic Triumph and the Rise of Ireland’s New Elite, Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons, 2008, →ISBN, page 4:
      Growing up in Dún Laoghaire in the 1980s, I remember all the hard men were sinewy, scrawny lads, hence the local description ‘more meat on a seagull’. The reason was simple: they were undernourished. [] The young wans, despite a couple of babies, were more or less the same, pinched, flat-chested and drawn.
    • 2015, Kevin Maher, “A Yuletide Bender”, in Last Night on Earth, London: Little, Brown and Company, →ISBN:
      He comes streaming out from under the stage, this time a feckin show-stopper, almost literally, because there’s eighty different acrobats above him, [] for this mad New Year’s show that has no story at all, other than this wan in silky robes who goes out with this fella in silky robes, and they’re from different enemy tribes of lads and wans in silky robes, and when they find out, they have this huge, aerial, acrobatic donnybrook that ends when everyone wraps their silk around each other up in the air, and then lets it all fall down to the ground, where the audience are, to show them how we're all part of one big silky family, and not to be fighting in the future.

Etymology 3[edit]

An inflected form.

Verb[edit]

wan

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of win.

References[edit]

  1. ^ wan, adj.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 5 January 2018.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑn

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately from Latin vannus.

Noun[edit]

wan f, m (plural wannen, diminutive wannetje n)

  1. winnowing basket

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

wan

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wannen
  2. imperative of wannen

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wan

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌰𐌽

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of わん

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

wan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of wān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of wán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of wǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of wàn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Nigerian Pidgin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English want.

Verb[edit]

wan

  1. want, want to

Noone[edit]

Noun[edit]

wan (plural boom)

  1. child

References[edit]


North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian winna, which derives from Proto-Germanic *winnaną.

Verb[edit]

wan

  1. (Föhr-Amrum Dialect) to win

Conjugation[edit]



Old English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wan

  1. third-person singular of winnan
    Grendel wan hwile wið Hroþgar.Grendel long fought against Hrothgar.
    (Beowulf ll. 151-2)

Pipil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Relational[edit]

-wan

  1. with, in relation to
    Shiwi nuwan wan niweli nimetzilwitia ne nukal yankwik
    Come with me and I can show you my new house

Declension[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

wan

  1. and, but
    Shinechmaka yey pula wan chikwasen tumat
    Give me three plantains and six tomatoes
    Nikilwij ma timuitakan yalua wan inte walajsik
    I told her/him to meet yesterday but she/he didn't come

Scots[edit]

Numeral[edit]

wan

  1. (West Central Scots) one.

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English one.

Number[edit]

wan

  1. (cardinal) one

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

wan

  1. Alternative form of wani

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English one.

Noun[edit]

wan

  1. The number one.
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:5:
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Numeral[edit]

wan

  1. One. Used with units of measurement and in times: wan aua, wan klok. See also wanpela.