dim

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Dim, dim., dím, and dìm

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

dim

  1. (mathematics) dimension

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dim, dym, from Old English dim, dimm (dim, dark, gloomy; wretched, grievous, sad, unhappy), from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz (dark), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰem- (to whisk, smoke, blow; dust, haze, cloud; obscure). Compare Faroese dimmur, Icelandic dimmur (dark) and dimma (darkness).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: dĭm, IPA(key): /dɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Adjective[edit]

dim (comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest)

  1. Not bright or colorful.
    The lighting was too dim for me to make out his facial features.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Shelley, Adonais
      that sustaining Love / Which, through the web of being blindly wove / By man and beast and earth and air and sea, / Burns bright or dim
  2. (colloquial) Not smart or intelligent.
    He may be a bit dim, but he's not stupid.
  3. Indistinct, hazy or unclear.
    His vision grew dimmer as he aged.
  4. Disapproving, unfavorable: rarely used outside the phrase take a dim view of.
  5. (music) Clipping of diminished.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun[edit]

dim (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Dimness.

Verb[edit]

dim (third-person singular simple present dims, present participle dimming, simple past and past participle dimmed)

  1. (transitive) To make something less bright.
    He dimmed the lights and put on soft music.
  2. (intransitive) To become darker.
    The lights dimmed briefly when the air conditioning was turned on.
  3. To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct; to take away the luster of; to darken; to dull; to obscure; to eclipse.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      a king among his courtiers, who dims all his attendants
    • (Can we date this quote by Cowper and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Now set the sun, and twilight dimmed the ways.
  4. To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of.
    • (Can we date this quote by C. Pitt and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Her starry eyes were dimmed with streaming tears.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈdɪm]
  • Hyphenation: dim

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch duim.

Noun[edit]

dim (plural, first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. thumb
  2. inch
    Synonym: inci

Etymology 2[edit]

From English dimmer.

Noun[edit]

dim (plural, first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. high-beam headlamp on a road vehicle.

Further reading[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

dim

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of dimēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of dimēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of dimēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of dimēt

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dimmr. Related to English dim and Icelandic dimmur.

Adjective[edit]

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmere, indefinite superlative dimmest, definite superlative dimmeste)

  1. dim
  2. to have bad vision
    Han er dim på synet
    His vision is dim/bad/poor

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dimmr.

Adjective[edit]

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmare, indefinite superlative dimmast, definite superlative dimmaste)

  1. dim
  2. to have bad vision
    Han er dim på synet
    His vision is dim/bad/poor

References[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dȉm m (Cyrillic spelling ди̏м)

  1. smoke

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dȉm m inan

  1. smoke

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nominative dìm
genitive díma
singular
nominative dìm
accusative dìm
genitive díma
dative dímu
locative dímu
instrumental dímom

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dim

  1. any
  2. no, not, none

Noun[edit]

dim m (plural {{{2}}})

  1. anything
  2. nothing, none, nil, zero

Particle[edit]

dim

  1. not

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dim ddim nim unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.