none

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: None

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English none, noon, non (not one), from Old English nān (not one, not any, none), from ne (not) + ān (one). Cognate with Scots nane (none), Saterland Frisian naan, neen (no, not any, none), West Frisian neen & gjin (no, none), Dutch neen & geen (no, none), Low German nēn, neen (none, no one), German nein & kein (no, none), Latin nōn (not).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • non [11th-17th c.]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

none

In this picture, none of the blue shapes are inside the yellow boundary.
  1. Not any of a given number or group, particularly:
    None of those is a good example. None are even acceptable.
    None of this meat tastes right.
    1. No one, nobody.
      None of those people is my father.
    2. No person.
      None of those people are my parents.
      • 2006, Clive James, North Face of Soho, page 253:
        Alas, none of these people were writing the reviews.
Usage notes[edit]

None used to replace uncountable nouns should always be singular. None used in place of countable nouns may be either singular or plural, unless the rest of the circumstances or phrasing require it to be one or the other.

Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Determiner[edit]

none

  1. (archaic outside Scotland) Not any; no.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XXV:
      the foles toke their lampes, but toke none oyle with them.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 138:
      None lasses were in the dunces' row. If one had been there people would have looked at her and felt sorry but not boys.

Adverb[edit]

none (not comparable)

  1. To no extent, in no way. [from 11th c.]
    I felt none the worse for my recent illness.
    He was none too pleased with the delays in the program that was supposed to be his legacy.
  2. Not at all. [from 13th c.]
    Now don't you worry none.
  3. (obsolete) No, not. [14th-16th c.]
    • c. 1390, Geoffrey Chaucer, "The Shipman's Tale", Canterbury Tales:
      And up into his contour-hous gooth he / To rekene with hymself, wel may be, / Of thilke yeer how that it with hym stood, / And how that he despended hadde his good, / And if that he encresses were or noon.

Noun[edit]

none (plural nones)

  1. A person without religious affiliation.
    • 2003, Jacob A. Belzen, Antoon Geels, Mysticism: A Variety of Psychological Perspectives, page 50:
      Both the religiously dis-identified ("nones") and the religiously committed report mystical experiences.
    • 2010, Robert D. Putnam, David E Campbell, American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us, page 591:
      Stable nones, that is, people who report in both years that they have no religious affiliation, are, in fact, much less religious
    • 2013, Michael Corbett, Politics and Religion in the United States:
      we have grouped people into nones (no religion), Jews, Catholics, mainline Protestants, and evangelical protestants.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French none, from Latin nōna (ninth; ninth hour).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

none (plural nones)

  1. Alternative form of nones: the ninth hour after dawn; (Christian) the religious service appointed to this hour.
  2. (obsolete) Synonym of midafternoon: the time around or following noon or nones.
    • 1656, T. Blount, Glossographia:
      None of the day, is the third quarter of the day beginning at Noon and lasting till the Sun be gone half way towards setting.
    • 1706, D. Cotes translating L.E. Dupin as A New Ecclesiastical History of the 16th Century. Vol. II, Chapter v, 43:
      The last, which began at the middle of the Afternoon, i.e. at half the Time between Noon and Sun-setting, was called None, because it began at the Ninth Hour.

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: suppose · else · entered · #505: none · river · change · happy

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "none, n.", in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

none m (plural nonen, diminutive noontje n)

  1. (music) An interval of 13 (kleine none) of 14 (grote none) halftones.

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Feminine of nono. Compare Italian nonna, Venetian nona.

Noun[edit]

none f (plural nonis)

  1. grandmother

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

none

  1. ninth

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

none f pl

  1. feminine plural of nono

Noun[edit]

none f pl

  1. plural of nona

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Numeral[edit]

nōne

  1. vocative masculine singular of nōnus

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

none (plural nones)

  1. Alternative form of nonne

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nonus.

Noun[edit]

none m

  1. (music) An interval of 13 (liten none) or 14 (stor none) halftones.

Inflection[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Latin nōna.

Noun[edit]

none f (oblique plural nones, nominative singular none, nominative plural nones)

  1. (originally) noon; the ninth hour of the day, equivalent to about 3pm by modern standards
  2. noon; midday (12pm)

Etymology 2[edit]

Latin nonna.

Noun[edit]

none f

  1. nominative singular of nonain

Tarantino[edit]

Adjective[edit]

none

  1. ninth

Adverb[edit]

none

  1. no

See also[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

none

  1. plural of nona