cap

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kæp/, [kʰæp]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cap
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English cappe, from Old English cæppe, from Late Latin cappa. Doublet of cape, chape, and cope.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. A close-fitting hat, either brimless or peaked.
    Hyponyms: see Thesaurus:headgear
    The children were all wearing caps to protect them from the sun.
  2. A special hat to indicate rank, occupation, etc.
  3. An academic mortarboard.
  4. A protective cover or seal.
    He took the cap off the bottle and splashed himself with some cologne.
  5. A crown for covering a tooth.
    He had golden caps on his teeth.
  6. The summit of a mountain, etc.
    There was snow on the cap of the mountain.
  7. An artificial upper limit or ceiling.
    Antonym: floor
    We should put a cap on the salaries, to keep them under control.
  8. The top part of a mushroom.
  9. (toy) A small amount of percussive explosive in a paper strip or plastic cup for use in a toy gun.
    Billy spent all morning firing caps with his friends, re-enacting storming the beach at Normandy.
  10. A small explosive device used to detonate a larger charge of explosives.
    He wired the cap to the bundle of dynamite, then detonated it remotely.
  11. (slang) A bullet used to shoot someone.
    • 2001, Charles Jade, Jade goes to Metreon
      Did he think they were going to put a cap in his ass right in the middle of Metreon?
  12. (soccer) An international appearance.
    Rio Ferdinand won his 50th cap for England in a game against Sweden.
    • 2017 November 10, Daniel Taylor, “Youthful England earn draw with Germany but Lingard rues late miss”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      Overall, though, England’s injury-diminished side coped well on the night when Ruben Loftus-Cheek, Jordan Pickford and Tammy Abraham all won their first caps.
  13. (obsolete) The top, or uppermost part; the chief.
  14. (obsolete) A respectful uncovering of the head.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church History of Britain, from the Birth of Jesus Christ until the Year MDCXLVIII, volume 1, London: Thomas Tegg and Son, published 1837, page 9:
      He that will give a cap and make a leg, in thanks for a favour he never received, deserveth rather to be blamed for want of wit, than to be praised for store of manners.
  15. (zoology) The whole top of the head of a bird from the base of the bill to the nape of the neck.
  16. (architecture) The uppermost of any assemblage of parts.
    the cap of column, door, etc.; a capital, coping, cornice, lintel, or plate
  17. Something covering the top or end of a thing for protection or ornament.
  18. (nautical) A collar of iron or wood used in joining spars, as the mast and the topmast, the bowsprit and the jib boom; also, a covering of tarred canvas at the end of a rope.
  19. (geometry) A portion of a spherical or other convex surface.
  20. A large size of writing paper.
    flat cap; foolscap; legal cap
  21. (African-American Vernacular) A lie or exaggeration.
    no cap
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

cap (third-person singular simple present caps, present participle capping, simple past and past participle capped)

  1. (transitive) To cover or seal with a cap.
  2. (transitive) To award a cap as a mark of distinction.
  3. (transitive) To lie over or on top of something.
  4. (transitive) To surpass or outdo.
  5. (transitive) To set an upper limit on something.
    cap wages.
  6. (transitive) To make something even more wonderful at the end.
    That really capped my day.
  7. (transitive, cricket) To select a player to play for a specified side.
  8. (transitive, slang) To shoot (someone) with a firearm.
    If he don't get outta my hood, I'm gonna cap his ass.
    In a school shooting, where some kid caps a bunch of other kids, where did he get the weapon? From a family member, probably their gun cabinet.
  9. (transitive, sports) To select to play for the national team.
    Peter Shilton is the most capped English footballer.
  10. (transitive, obsolete) To salute by uncovering the head respectfully.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  11. To deprive of a cap.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, A View of the State of Ireland as It Was in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, Dublin: Laurence Flin, published 1763, page 50:
      As if one going to diſtrain upon his own Land or Tenement, where lawfully he may; yet if in doing thereof, he tranſgreſs the leaſt Point of the Common Law, he ſtraight committeth Felony. Or if one, by any other Occaſion, take any thing from another, as Boys uſe ſometimes to cap one another, the ſame is ſtraight Felony.
  12. (African American Vernacular English) To tell a lie.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From capitalization, by shortening.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. (finance) Capitalization.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From capital, by shortening.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. (informal) An uppercase letter.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cap (third-person singular simple present caps, present participle capping, simple past and past participle capped)

  1. (transitive, informal) To convert text to uppercase.

Etymology 4[edit]

From capacitor, by shortening.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. (electronics) capacitor
    Parasitic caps.

Etymology 5[edit]

Shortening of capture.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. (colloquial) A recording or screenshot.
    • 1996 December 9, Fox [username], “Anyone has a cap of yesterday's irc-convention on undernet ?”, in alt.paranet.ufo, Usenet[2]:
    • 1998 September 26, Mr Hanky [username] <meister_hanky@hotmail.com>, “req: does anyone have a cap of Gabby's behind from "Forget Me Not"”, in alt.tv.xena, Usenet[3], retrieved August 7, 2016:
      If you have a cap of Gabby's bare butt from the "forget me not" episode please post or mail it...
    • 1998 April 27, Johan [username], “Jennifer on Letterman”, in alt.fan.jen-aniston, Usenet[4], retrieved August 7, 2016:
      Here's a cap of Jennifer from her latest Letterman appearance []
    • 2000 March 4, RichieH [username], “Please somebody get a cap of Faye from steps at the Brits!!!!!!!!”, in alt.tv.shaggable.babes, Usenet[5]:
      Please be assured that when I do get around to capping the Brits, there will NOT be one single cap of that slutty bitch, her whorishness has dropped to even lower levels than before.
    Anyone have a cap of the games last night?

Verb[edit]

cap (third-person singular simple present caps, present participle capping, simple past and past participle capped)

  1. (transitive) To take a screenshot or to record a copy of a video.
    • 2001 December 3, Methos [username], alt.fan.televisionx, Usenet[6]:
      I've capped in VCD format, so will eventually post it to abme (I've since found out that it's a bit OT for this group)
    • 2002 June 11, test . com Ground Hog [username], alt.luser.recovery, Usenet[7]:
      Please tell me someone capped it!!!!
    • 2003 February 18, jacuk [username], alt.fan.pornstar.darrian, Usenet[8]:
      If I had a method of capping from video tapes there's a movie that I can no longer remember the name of which has a single scene with Racquel and Derrick as a newly married couple having sex under the lustful eyes of Joey Silvera.

Etymology 6[edit]

Clipping of capsule

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. (slang) A capsule of a drug.
    • 2012, Alex Wyndham Baker, Cursive
      Glass bottles of liquid LSD; moist blocks of Manali charras and Malana cream; sachets of smack; a hundred caps of MDMA and a phial of Australian DMT; ampoules of medical morphine and a dense pad of four thousand Californian blotters.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 7[edit]

Scots [Term?], probably from Old English copp (a cup).

Noun[edit]

cap (plural caps)

  1. (obsolete) A wooden drinking-bowl with two handles.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *capum, from Latin caput. Plural form capiti from Latin capita. Compare Romanian cap.

Noun[edit]

cap n (plural capiti/capite)

  1. head

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan cap, from Vulgar Latin *capum (head, chief), from Latin caput (head, etc.), from Proto-Italic *kaput, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kauput-, *kaput-. Compare also French personne (which can mean either "person" or "nobody").

Noun[edit]

cap m (plural caps)

  1. (anatomy) head
  2. boss, chief, leader
    cap d'estathead of state
  3. cape (piece of land)
  4. (heraldry) chief
  5. end
    cap de setmanaweekend
Derived terms[edit]

Determiner[edit]

cap (indeclinable)

  1. no, not any (usually with no or other negative particle)
    No hi ha cap iogurt de maduixa.
    There is no strawberry yogurt.
    • 2019 August 21, Rosa M. Bravo, “La demanda de tractament per deixar la cocaïna creix”, in El Punt Avui[9]:
      A més, 3.500 persones han passat per les sales de consum ateses per professionals, on cap de les 214 sobredosis ha estat mortal.
      Additionally, 3,500 people have passed through the [drug] use rooms tended by professionals, where none of the 214 overdoses has been fatal.
  2. any (in questions and suppositions)
    Que hi falta cap peça?
    Is there any missing piece?

Pronoun[edit]

cap

  1. none, not one (usually with no or other negative particle), example no n'hi ha cap de maduixa ("there is not any strawberry flavoured one")
  2. anyone, (in questions and suppositions), example que en falta cap? ("is there anyone missing?")

Preposition[edit]

cap

  1. towards, to
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

cap

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of cabre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of cabre

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Occitan cap, from Latin caput. Doublet of chef.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap m (plural caps)

  1. (geography) cape
  2. (archaic) head
  3. (nautical) heading
  4. (figuratively) goal, direction, course
    Synonym: cible
    cap stratégiquestrategic course
  5. (Quebec, geography) cap (summit of a mountain)

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡ʃap]
  • Hyphenation: cap

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately from Indo-Aryan. Compare Hindi छाप (chāp), Gujarati છાપ (chāp), Bengali ছাপ (chap), all meaning stamp, seal.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural, first-person possessive capku, second-person possessive capmu, third-person possessive capnya)

  1. seal, stamp.
    Synonyms: stempel, tera
  2. record.
    Synonym: rekaman
  3. printing.
    Synonyms: cetak, cetakan
  4. trademark.
    Synonyms: merk dagang, etiket
  5. (figuratively) characteristic.
    Synonyms: ciri, sifat

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Noun[edit]

cap (plural, first-person possessive capku, second-person possessive capmu, third-person possessive capnya)

  1. sound of tongue smacking
    Synonym: kecap

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap

  1. Alternative form of cappe

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old Occitan cap.

Noun[edit]

cap m (plural caps)

  1. head
    • 1369-1400, Jean Froissart, Chroniques
      Armez de pié en cap
      Armed from head to toe

Descendants[edit]

  • French: cap
  • English: cape

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan cap, from Vulgar Latin *capum, from Latin caput.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap m (plural caps)

  1. head (the part of the body of an animal or human which contains the brain, mouth and main sense organs)
  2. head (leader, chief, mastermind)
  3. cape, headland

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

from Albanian cjap, throughRomanian țap

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap m anim

  1. billy-goat
  2. buck (male of an antlered animal)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cap

  1. second-person singular imperative of capić

Further reading[edit]

  • cap in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *capum, from Latin caput, from Proto-Italic *kaput, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kauput-, *kaput-. Plural form capete from Latin capita.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap n (plural capete)

  1. head
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French cap.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap n (plural capuri)

  1. cape (headland)
Declension[edit]

Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cap m (genitive singular capa, nominative plural capy, genitive plural capov), declension pattern chlap for singular, dub for plural

  1. a male goat

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cap in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk