lid

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See also: Lid, līd, łid, lið, and líð

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lid, lyd, from Old English hlid, from Proto-West Germanic *hlid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą (compare Dutch lid, German Lid (eyelid), Swedish lid (gate)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlitós (covered), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (to cover).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lɪd/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪd

Noun[edit]

lid (plural lids)

  1. The top or cover of a container.
  2. (slang) A cap or hat.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XII, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      “Yes, sir, if that was the language of love, I'll eat my hat,” said the blood relation, alluding, I took it, to the beastly straw contraption in which she does her gardening, concerning which I can only say that it is almost as foul as Uncle Tom's Sherlock Holmes deerstalker, which has frightened more crows than any other lid in Worcestershire.
  3. (slang) One ounce of cannabis.
  4. (surfing, slang, chiefly Australia) A bodyboard or bodyboarder.
  5. (slang) A motorcyclist's crash helmet.
  6. (slang) In amateur radio, an incompetent operator.
  7. Clipping of eyelid.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter III, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped ; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].
  8. (microelectronics) A hermetically sealed top piece on a microchip such as the integrated heat spreader on a CPU.
  9. (figuratively) A restraint or control, as when "putting a lid" on something.
    • 2011, Dave Ramsey, EntreLeadership (page 11)
      Basically he says that there is a lid on my organization and on my future, and that lid is me. I am the problem with my company and you are the problem with your company.
  10. (Liverpudlian) A kid (from the rhyming slang bin lid)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

lid (third-person singular simple present lids, present participle lidding, simple past and past participle lidded)

  1. (transitive) To put a lid on (something).
    Antonym: unlid

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch lid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid (plural lede, diminutive lidjie)

  1. member (of a group or club)
  2. member, limb

Derived terms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ľudъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid m

  1. people

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • lid in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • lid in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlít.

Noun[edit]

lid c (singular definite liden, not used in plural form)

  1. trust

Verb[edit]

lid

  1. imperative of lide

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch lit, let, leet, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *liþuz.

Noun[edit]

lid n (plural leden, diminutive lidje n or ledeken n)

  1. member (of a group)
    Synonym: lidmaat
  2. member, limb (extremity of a body)
    Synonym: ledemaat
  3. member, penis
  4. (obsolete, grammar) article, particularly in the Southern diminutive form ledeken [from late 16th c.]
    Synonyms: lidwoord, voorlid
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: lid
  • Indonesian: lid
  • Negerhollands: lid, leden, leeden

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch lit, let, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą.

Noun[edit]

lid n (plural leden, diminutive lidje n)

  1. (rare) lid, cover
Derived terms[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch lid (member), from Middle Dutch lit, let, leet, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *liþuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪt]
  • Hyphenation: lid

Noun[edit]

lid (first-person possessive lidku, second-person possessive lidmu, third-person possessive lidnya)

  1. (colloquial) member (of a group).
    Synonym: anggota

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English hlid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid (plural liddis)

  1. A lid; a piece of material used to cover a container.
  2. The exterior of a gravesite, ditch, or pit.
  3. The covering over one's eyes; an eyelid.
  4. (rare) The top layer of a pastry dish.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

lid

  1. imperative of lide

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lid

  1. present tense of lide
  2. imperative of lide

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid f (plural lidi)

  1. (pre-1917 or dialectal) a sloping mountainside or hillside covered with grass or forest. Alternative form of li.

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *liþuz, whence also Old English liþ and Old Norse liðr.

Noun[edit]

lid ?

  1. member

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: lit

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish, from Latin lītem, singular accusative of līs (strife, dispute, quarrel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid f (plural lides)

  1. lawsuit
    Synonym: litigio
  2. fight
    Synonym: lucha

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid c

  1. A slope of a hill.

Declension[edit]

Declension of lid 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lid liden lider liderna
Genitive lids lidens liders lidernas

Verb[edit]

lid

  1. imperative of lida.

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Lied.

Noun[edit]

lid (nominative plural lids)

  1. song

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid

  1. Soft mutation of llid.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
llid lid unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlíð, from Proto-Germanic *hlīþō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lid f (definite singular lia or lida, dative lin)

  1. mountain side, wooded slope of a mountain or summit[1]

Usage notes[edit]

It lies in the concept of this denomination in Westrobothnia, that the slope should be available either for cultivation or at least bear grass and healthy forest. Many villages and homes have hereof names.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “LI(D)”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 401