lyd

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: LYD and lýð-

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hljóð (a sound).

Noun[edit]

lyd c (singular definite lyden, plural indefinite lyde)

  1. sound
  2. noise
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See lyde (to sound) or lyde (to obey).

Verb[edit]

lyd

  1. imperative of lyde

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lyd

  1. Alternative form of lid

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Danish lyd, from Old Norse hljóð (a sound).

Noun[edit]

lyd m (definite singular lyden, indefinite plural lyd or lyder, definite plural lydene)

  1. sound
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lýðr (people).

Noun[edit]

lyd m (definite singular lyden, indefinite plural lyder, definite plural lydene)

  1. (a group of) people

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

lyd

  1. imperative of lyde

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse hljóð n (a sound) though heavily influenced by cognate Danish lyd. From Proto-Germanic *hleuþą. Other cognates include Icelandic hljóð n, Faroese ljóð n, and Swedish ljud. Ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *ḱlew- (to hear).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lyd m (definite singular lyden, indefinite plural lydar, definite plural lydane)

  1. sound
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lýðr m (people), from Proto-Germanic *liudiz m or f, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁léwdʰis m (people), from the Proto-Indo-European root *h₁lewdʰ- (to grow (up)). Germanic cognates include Icelandic lýður m, German Leute pl, Dutch lieden pl, and Old English lēod m. Indo-European cognates include Lithuanian liáudis f (people), Polish ludzie m pl, and Russian люди (ljudi).

Noun[edit]

lyd m (definite singular lyden, indefinite plural lydar, definite plural lydane)

  1. (a group of) people
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse hljóðr (silent, taciturn).

Adjective[edit]

lyd (masculine and feminine lyd, neuter lydt, definite singular and plural lyde, comparative lydare, indefinite superlative lydast, definite superlative lydaste)

  1. audible, clear, intelligible
  2. not having adequate sound isolation
  3. silent
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

lyd

  1. imperative of lyda and lyde

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

lyd

  1. imperative of lyda.