li

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Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

An early romanization of Chinese Mandarin (). As a Korean unit, via the Yale romanization of Korean (ri), from the Chinese distance.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Korea): ri

Noun[edit]

li (plural lis or li)

  1. The Chinese mile, a traditional unit of distance equal to 1500 chis or 150 zhangs, now standardized as a half-kilometer (500 meters).
  2. The Korean mile, a traditional unit of distance equivalent to about 393 m.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Mandarin 市厘 ().

Noun[edit]

li (plural li)

  1. A traditional Chinese unit of weight, equal to one-thousandth of a liang, or fifty milligrams.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Mandarin ().

Noun[edit]

li (plural li)

  1. (Chinese philosophy) A meaningful ceremony or ritual; etiquette, behaviour.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Mandarin ().

Noun[edit]

li (plural li)

  1. An ancient Chinese cauldron having three hollow legs.

Etymology 5[edit]

Symbol[edit]

li

  1. (mathematics) Logarithmic integral function

Etymology 6[edit]

Altered from la. vowel changed to 'e' to signify a raised note.

Noun[edit]

li (uncountable)

  1. (music) In solfège, the raised sixth note of a major scale (the note A-sharp in the fixed-do system).

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From South Slavic, compare Serbo-Croatian lȉh (exclusive), lȋh (false, odd), Slovene lȋh (uneven, odd).[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

li f (definite singular lia)

  1. pox
  2. olive scab, peacock spot (Cycloconium oleaginum)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Compounds[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “lijë”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 227

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin līnum.

Noun[edit]

li m (definite singular liri)

  1. flax

Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illis, dative common plural of ille. Compare Romanian le.

Pronoun[edit]

li f (short/unstressed accusative form of eali)

  1. (direct object) them (all-female group)

Related terms[edit]

  • (feminine/masculine plural dative- short/unstressed form)
  • u (feminine singular accusative- short/unstressed form)
  • (a) lor (feminine/masculine plural dative- long/stressed form)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illī, dative common singular of ille.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

li (enclitic and proclitic)

  1. him, her, it (indirect object)

Declension[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

li m (uncountable)

  1. li (Chinese unit of distance).

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian lui, French lui, or Spanish le, plus the i of personal pronouns.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

li (accusative lin, possessive lia)

  1. (personal pronoun) he
Usage notes[edit]
  • Li is traditionally used as both a masculine and a gender-neutral pronoun, but since the 1970s generic usage has sometimes been criticized and is increasingly being avoided and replaced by "li aŭ ŝi". Some people think this is an imperfection solution which is inappropriately long, and since the 2010s it is additionally also criticized by some as being too exclusive to non-binary people. In response to such criticisms, there have been various proposals for new pronouns, but the only proposal that has been gaining some adoption is ri.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (person whose gender is unknown): ri, ŝli

Related terms[edit]

  • ili (they) (plural)

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

li m (plural lis)

  1. li (Chinese unit of distance).

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Guinea-Bissau Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese ali. Cognates with Kabuverdianu li.

Adverb[edit]

li

  1. here

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French lui.

Pronoun[edit]

li (contracted form l)

  1. he
  2. him
  3. she
  4. her
  5. it

Etymology 2[edit]

From French lire.

Verb[edit]

li

  1.  To read

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

lu (he, him, she, her, it, that) +‎ -i (-s; plural)

Pronoun[edit]

li pl

  1. they, them

Related terms[edit]

  • ili (they, them) (masculine)
  • eli (they, them) (feminine)
  • oli (they, them) (neuter)

Interlingue[edit]

Article[edit]

li

  1. the

Istriot[edit]

Article[edit]

li

  1. masculine plural definite article
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin illī, nominative masculine plural of ille.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

li m pl (female le, singular lo)

  1. (accusative) them
    Li ricordo.I remember them.
Usage notes[edit]

Never elides.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of gli.

Article[edit]

li m pl (singular lo)

  1. Archaic form of gli.
    li studentithe students

Pronoun[edit]

li m pl (singular lo)

  1. (dative) Archaic form of gli.

Etymology 3[edit]

Adverb[edit]

li

  1. Misspelling of .

Anagrams[edit]


Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese ali.

Adverb[edit]

li

  1. here

Kurdish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

li

  1. in
    li Kurdistanê (in Kurdistan)
  2. li ser: on:
    li ser maseyê (on the table)


Livonian[edit]

Verb[edit]

li

  1. 2nd person singular imperative form of lǟdõ

Louisiana Creole French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French lui.

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. he
  2. him
  3. she
  4. her

Maltese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • illi (after a word-final consonant cluster)

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic اَلَّذِي(allaḏī, relative pronoun). Compare common dialectal Arabic اللي(illi, lli). The use as a conjunction is widely found in Maghrebi Arabic, so there is no reason to consider it a Romance influence (as might otherwise be thought; compare Italian che, which is both a relative pronoun and the conjunction “that”).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. (relative) who; which; that
    ir-raġel li seraq il-karozza
    the man who stole the car

Conjunction[edit]

li

  1. that
    Nixtieq ngħidilha li nħobbha.
    I want to tell her that I love her.

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

li (Zhuyin ˙ㄌㄧ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of
  4. Pinyin transcription of

li

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French le, lui

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. he, she, it (third-person singular personal pronoun)

See also[edit]


Michif[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French le.

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

li m (feminine la, masculine and feminine plural lii)

  1. the

Miskito[edit]

Noun[edit]

li

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Eduard Conzemius, Ethnographical Survey of the Miskito and Sumu Indians (1932)

Neapolitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. Alternative form of 'i

Niuatoputapu[edit]

Article[edit]

li

  1. the

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French li, from Vulgar Latin *illui, a Vulgar Latin dative of Classical Latin ille.

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. (Guernsey) him

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlíð

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

li f or m (definite singular lia or lien, indefinite plural lier, definite plural liene)

  1. A sloping mountainside or hillside covered with grass or forest.

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hlíð

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

li f (definite singular lia, indefinite plural lier, definite plural liene)

  1. A sloping mountainside or hillside covered with grass or forest.

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Article[edit]

li

  1. the

Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin ille (that).

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

li

  1. the (masculine nominative singular and plural definite article)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. third-person singular indirect object pronoun; to him, to her, to it
Descendants[edit]
  • French: lui

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ille (that).

Article[edit]

li

  1. the (masculine nominative singular and plural definite article)

Polish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

li (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) only

Etymology 2[edit]

From Mandarin ()

Noun[edit]

li n (indeclinable)

  1. li, Chinese unit of distance
  2. li, Chinese unit of weight

Etymology 3[edit]

From Mandarin ()

Noun[edit]

li n (indeclinable)

  1. li, a meaningful ceremony or ritual

Further reading[edit]

  • li in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -i

Verb[edit]

li

  1. First-person singular (eu) preterite indicative of ler

Romanian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

li (dative form of ele; form of le)

  1. to them

Usage notes[edit]

This word is used when le (which is dative) is combined with the following accusatives:

  • îl (the accusative of el, contracted as li-l)
  • îi (the accusative of ei, contracted as li-i)
  • le (the accusative of ele)
  • se (the reflexive accusative of all third-person pronouns)

See also[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *li.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

li (Cyrillic spelling ли)

  1. question-forming interrogative particle (postpositive, unlike other particles, never first word in a sentence)
    poznaješ li me — do you know me?
    jesi li stigao na odredište? — did you reach the destination?
    jeste li ga vid(j)eli — have you seen him?
    gd(j)e li se samo nalazimo? — where could we be?
    kad li će doći? — when will he/they come?
    je li? — Is it? (Is that so? Isn't that so?)
  2. used as conjunction with da (except in Croatian, "je li" is used instead)
    da li — whether
    nemam pojma da li je došao — I have no idea whether he came (Croatian: "nemam pojma je li došao")
  3. (as a conjunction) if
    pokušaš li me napasti, ja ću ti uzvratitishould you try to attack me, I'll strike you back (when "li" is used in this sense, it is usually translated as a subjunctive form "should", and when "ako" is used, it is usually translated as "if" - ako me pokušaš napasti = if you try to attack me)
  4. used as an emphatic intensifier
    a sn(ij)eg pada li pada — the snow just keeps falling and falling...
    d(ij)ete plače li plače — the child just keeps crying and crying...

See also[edit]

  • zar (interrogative particle)

Sicilian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illī or illae, nominative plurals of ille.

Article[edit]

li m pl or f pl

  1. (definite) the

See also[edit]

Sicilian articles
Masculine Feminine
indefinite singular un, nu na
definite singular lu, û la, â
definite plural li, î li, î

Vietnamese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Sino-Vietnamese word from (“glass”).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier cái) li

  1. cup, glass (def. 2)

See also[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Particle[edit]

li

  1. Appended with a hyphen to a verb, it turns the entire clause it is in into a question.

Walloon[edit]

Article[edit]

li (after an open syllabe and/or before a vowel : l', plural : les, plural after an open syllabe and before a vowel: ls)

  1. the
    Li mwaisse
    The master
    Li maistrece
    The mistress
    L' ome
    The man
    C' est li l' mwaisse
    He is the master
    Les måjhons
    The houses
    Les omes
    The men
    Çou sont ls åtes tchesteas
    These are the other castles

Pronoun[edit]

li

  1. him, her, it (direct object, before verb)
    C' est li l' mwaisse
    It's him who's the master

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

li f

  1. Alternative form of lid[1]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse , specifically the accusative léa, from Proto-Germanic *lewô. The duosyllabic accent might be derived from the definite singular form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 m (definite singular lien)

  1. scythe[1]
Compounds[edit]
  • libɑka (the trailing edge of a scythe)
  • liörv (shaft on a scythe)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

li n (definite singular liä)

  1. afterbirth from calving[2]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse líða, from Proto-Germanic *līþaną. The sense “suffer” may be borrowed from Middle Low German, but derive from the same root in any case.

Verb[edit]

li

  1. To elapse.[1]
    he li på dɑgen
    The day draws to a close.
    he var brɑno lide
    It was quite late.
  2. To come to an end, run out.
    Da mâtn fâr lii fara ṣwiṇa strii.
    When the food begins to run low, the swine begin to fight. (proverb)
  3. To suffer.[1]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Larsson, Evert, Söderström, Sven, “lid s. li:, lie s. lî:, lida v. li: etc”, in Hössjömålet : ordbok över en sydvästerbottnisk dialekt [The Hössjö speech: dictionary of a southern Westrobothnian dialect] (in Swedish) →ISBN, page 119
  2. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “LI” in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 400

Zou[edit]

Numeral[edit]

li

  1. four

References[edit]