leie

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See also: Leie

Central Franconian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German liegen, from Old High German liogan, from Proto-West Germanic *leugan, from Proto-Germanic *leuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewgʰ-. Compare Limburgish lege, Luxembourgish léien, Dutch liegen, German lügen.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • lüjje (Ripuarian variant, from the 2nd and 3rd persons singular under standard German influence)
  • liehe (southern Moselle Franconian)
  • leje, leeje (Ripuarian and northern Moselle Franconian)
  • luje (Kirchröadsj)

Verb[edit]

leie (third-person singular present leit, past tense leiet or loog, present participle leiend or leiens, past participle jeloage)

  1. (Kirchröadsj, intransitive) to lie; to tell lies
    Doe kans veule dat heë leit.You can tell that he is lying.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German leiten, from Old High German leiten, from Proto-West Germanic *laidijan, from Proto-Germanic *laidijaną. Compare Limburgish lèèje, Luxembourgish leeden, English lead, German leiten, Dutch leiden.

Verb[edit]

leie (third-person singular present leit, past tense leiet, present participle leiend or leiens, past participle jeleid)

  1. (Kirchröadsj, transitive) to lead
  2. (Kirchröadsj, transitive) to manage (an orginization)
  3. (Kirchröadsj, transitive) to conduct (a liquid, electricity, etc.)
  4. (Kirchröadsj, intransitive) to lead, to go, to follow a path to
Derived terms[edit]

Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

leie

  1. to lie, to rest

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

leie

  1. simple past of lien (to lie (be in a horizontal position))

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse leiga.

Verb[edit]

leie (present tense leier, past tense leide, past participle leid)

  1. to rent or hire

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse leiða, from Proto-Germanic *laidijaną, originally a causative of *līþaną (whence modern Norwegian Nynorsk lide). Cognates include English lead.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

leie (present tense leiar or leier, past tense leia or leidde, past participle leia or leidd)

  1. to command, lead, direct
  2. to conduct (music, heat, electricity)
  3. to hold someone's hand, have on a leash (dog)
  4. to lead (be in the lead)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the Old Norse noun and verb leiða. Confer with Proto-Germanic *laiþijaną. Related to modern English loathe.

Noun[edit]

leie f (definite singular leia, indefinite plural leier, definite plural leiene)

  1. boredom
    Synonym: keisemd
  2. an annoying thing or person; a bore
  3. an affliction

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse lægi n.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leie n (definite singular leiet, indefinite plural leie, definite plural leia)

  1. a place to lie down
  2. a lying down position
  3. the act of one who is lying down
  4. (geology, mining) a layer
  5. (anatomy, rare) a mammalian womb
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Adjective[edit]

leie

  1. definite singular of lei
  2. plural of lei

References[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German liegen, Dutch liggen, English lie.

Verb[edit]

leie

  1. to lie, to rest
  2. to be sick in bed
  3. to loaf

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

leie

  1. third-person singular/plural present subjunctive of la