leid

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See also: leið

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden ‎(language), from Old English lēoden ‎(national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode ‎(people). More at lede.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leid ‎(plural leids)

  1. (Scotland, chiefly poetic) language
Usage notes[edit]
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leid.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

leid

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leiden
  2. imperative of leiden

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German leit from Old High German leid. From Proto-Germanic *laiþaz, whence also English loathe and Old Norse leiðr. From Proto-Indo-European *h₂leyt- ‎(unpleasant; to loathe, transgress) whence also Latin laedō ‎(strike, betray).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

leid ‎(comparative leider, superlative am leidesten)

  1. uncomfortable

Usage notes[edit]

Only used with sein and werden and as part of the verb leidtun (see es tut mir leid).

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • leid in Duden online

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Noun[edit]

leid f ‎(genitive singular leide, nominative plural leideanna)

  1. hint, inkling
  2. prompt
  3. pointer, clue

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

leid

  1. past participle of leie

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laiþaz, whence also Old English lāþ, Old Norse leiðr.

Adjective[edit]

leid

  1. uncomfortable

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden ‎(language), from Old English lēoden ‎(national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode ‎(people). More at lede.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leid ‎(plural leids)

  1. language
Usage notes[edit]
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leid.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English lede, leed, from Old English lēad ‎(lead (the metal)). More at lead.

Noun[edit]

leid ‎(plural leids)

  1. lead