leid

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See also: leið

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden (language), from Old English lēoden (national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode (people). More at lede.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leid (plural leids)

  1. (Scotland, chiefly poetic) language
Usage notes[edit]
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leid.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

leid

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leiden
  2. imperative of leiden

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German leid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

leid (comparative leider, superlative am leidesten)

  1. uncomfortable

Usage notes[edit]

Only used in certain phrases.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • leid in Duden online

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

leid f (genitive leide, plural leideanna)

  1. hint, inkling
  2. prompt
  3. pointer, clue

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

leid

  1. past participle of leie

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laiþaz, whence also Old English lāþ, Old Norse leiðr.

Adjective[edit]

leid

  1. uncomfortable

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From earlier leed, from Middle English lede, reduced form of leden, leoden (language), from Old English lēoden (national language", literally, "of the people), from Old English lēode (people). More at lede.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leid (plural leids)

  1. language
Usage notes[edit]
  • Commonly understood language, either literally or metaphorically:
    A daena speak the leid.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English lede, leed, from Old English lēad (lead (the metal)). More at lead.

Noun[edit]

leid (plural leids)

  1. lead