prompt

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prompt, from Latin prōmptus (visible, apparent, evident), past participle of prōmō (to take or bring out or forth, produce, bring to light), from prō (forth, forward) + emō (to take, acquire, buy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prompt (comparative more prompt, superlative most prompt)

  1. Quick; acting without delay.
    He was very prompt at getting a new job.
    a prompt response
  2. On time; punctual.
    Be prompt for your appointment.
  3. (archaic) Ready; willing to act.
    • 1623, Shakespeare, William, Antony & Cleopatra, act 3, scene 8:
      Tell him, I am prompt / To lay my Crowne at's feete, and there to kneele.
  4. (finance) Front: closest or nearest, in futures trading.
    • 2013 July 5, Davis W. Edwards, Energy Investing DeMystified: A Self-Teaching Guide, McGraw Hill Professional, →ISBN, page 19:
      When physical crude oil transactions are priced, they are usually marked to the prompt month futures contract. The prompt month futures contract is the next futures contract to settle.
    • 2021 May 11, Neil C. Schofield, Commodity Derivatives: Markets and Applications, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 448:
      The settlement ratio is determined as follows: i) If the prompt futures price of coal at maturity is less than or equal to the floor price, the ratio will be one.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

prompt (plural prompts)

  1. A reminder or cue.
  2. (business, dated) A time limit given for payment of an account for produce purchased, this limit varying with different goods.
  3. (computing) A sequence of characters that is displayed to indicate that a computer is ready to receive input.
    I filled in my name where the prompt appeared on the computer screen but my account wasn't recognized.
  4. (writing) A suggestion for inspiration given to an author.
  5. (machine learning) Textual input given to a large language model in order to have it generate a desired output.
    • 2022 April 15, Steven Johnson; Nikita Iziev, “A.I. Is Mastering Language. Should We Trust What It Says?”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      For instance, using the “instruct” mode, I once gave GPT-3 the prompt: “Write an essay discussing the role of metafiction in the work of Italo Calvino.”

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

prompt (third-person singular simple present prompts, present participle prompting, simple past and past participle prompted)

  1. (transitive) To lead (someone) toward what they should say or do.
    I prompted him to get a new job.
  2. (transitive, theater and television) To show or tell an actor/person the words they should be saying, or actions they should be doing.
    If he forgets his words I will prompt him.
  3. (transitive) To initiate; to cause or lead to.
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, in BBC[2]:
      The only sour note on a virtually perfect night for England came from shameful 'monkey' chanting aimed at Ashley Cole and Ashley Young from a section of Bulgaria's fans which later prompted an official complaint from the Football Association to Uefa.
    • 2012, Christoper Zara, Tortured Artists: From Picasso and Monroe to Warhol and Winehouse, the Twisted Secrets of the World's Most Creative Minds, part 1, chapter 1, 27:
      On October 6, 1927, Warner Bros. released The Jazz Singer, the first sound-synched feature film, prompting a technological shift of unprecedented speed and unstoppable force. Within two years, nearly every studio release was a talkie.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French prompt, from Latin prōmptus.

Adverb[edit]

prompt

  1. immediately, promptly
    Hij betaalde prompt.
    He paid promptly.
    Synonym: meteen

Adjective[edit]

prompt (not comparable)

  1. quick, immediate
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of prompt
uninflected prompt
inflected prompte
comparative prompter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial prompt prompter het promptst
het promptste
indefinite m./f. sing. prompte promptere promptste
n. sing. prompt prompter promptste
plural prompte promptere promptste
definite prompte promptere promptste
partitive prompts prompters
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English prompt, from Middle French prompt, from Latin prōmptus.

Noun[edit]

prompt m (plural prompts)

  1. (computing) prompt

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin promptus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pʁɔ̃/, /pʁɔ̃t/, /pʁɔ̃pt/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

prompt (feminine prompte, masculine plural prompts, feminine plural promptes)

  1. prompt, swift, quick
  2. (Louisiana) curt

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prompt, from Latin prōmptus (visible, apparent, evident), past participle of prōmō (to take or bring out or forth, produce, bring to light), from prō (forth, forward) + emō (to take, acquire, buy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prompt (strong nominative masculine singular prompter, comparative prompter, superlative am promptesten)

  1. immediate, swift, expeditious, prompt

Further reading[edit]

  • prompt” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • prompt” in Duden online

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōmptus, past participle of prōmō (I take, bring out, produce, bring to light).

Adjective[edit]

prompt m

  1. (Jersey) hasty

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prompt, from Latin promptus, from promere (bring out).

Adverb[edit]

prompt

  1. quickly and punctually; promptly

Adjective[edit]

prompt (singular and plural prompt, comparative mer prompt, superlative mest prompt)

  1. quick and punctual; prompt

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French prompt, from Latin promptus.

Adjective[edit]

prompt m or n (feminine singular promptă, masculine plural prompți, feminine and neuter plural prompte)

  1. prompt

Declension[edit]