prompt

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French prompt, from Latin promptus ‎(visible, apparent, evident, at hand, prepared, ready, quick, prompt, inclined, disposed), past participle of promere ‎(to take or bring out or forth, produce, bring to light), from pro ‎(forth, forward) + emere ‎(to take, acquire, buy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prompt ‎(comparative more prompt, superlative most prompt)

  1. (archaic) Ready, willing (to act).
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, Antony & Cleopatra, III.8:
      Tell him, I am prompt To lay my Crowne at's feete, and there to kneele.
  2. Quick, acting without delay.
    He was very prompt at getting a new job.
  3. On time, punctual.
    Be prompt for your appointment.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

prompt ‎(plural prompts)

  1. A reminder or cue.
  2. (business, dated) A time limit given for payment of an account for produce purchased, this limit varying with different goods.
    • John Stuart Mill
      To cover any probable difference of price which might arise before the expiration of the prompt, which for this article [tea] is three months.
  3. (computing) A symbol that appears on a monitor to indicate that the computer is ready to receive input.
    I filled in my name where the prompt appeared on the computer screen but my account wasn't recognized.
  4. (writing) A suggestion for inspiration given to an author.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

prompt ‎(third-person singular simple present prompts, present participle prompting, simple past and past participle prompted)

  1. (transitive) To lead someone toward what they should say or do.
    I prompted him to get a new job.
    • 2011 September 2, Phil McNulty, “Bulgaria 0-3 England”, BBC:
      The only sour note on a virtually perfect night for England came from shameful 'monkey' chanting aimed at Ashley Cole and Ashley Young from a section of Bulgaria's fans which later prompted an official complaint from the Football Association to Uefa.
  2. (theater and television) To show or tell an actor/person the words they should be saying, or actions they should be doing.
    If he forgets his words I will prompt him.
  3. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2012, Christoper Zara, Tortured Artists: From Picasso and Monroe to Warhol and Winehouse, the Twisted Secrets of the World's Most Creative Minds, part 1, chapter 1, page 27:
      On October 6, 1927, Warner Bros. released The Jazz Singer, the first sound-synched feature film, prompting a technological shift of unprecedented speed and unstoppable force. Within two years, nearly every studio release was a talkie.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin promptus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prompt m (feminine singular prompte, masculine plural prompts, feminine plural promptes)

  1. prompt, swift, quick

External links[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin prōmptus, past participle of prōmō ‎(I take, bring out, produce, bring to light).

Adjective[edit]

prompt m (f prompte, m plural prompts, f plural promptes)

  1. (Jersey) hasty

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French, from Latin derived from promere ‎(bring out)

Adverb[edit]

prompt

  1. quickly and punctually; promptly

Adjective[edit]

prompt (masculine prompt; feminine prompt; neuter prompt; plural prompt; comparative mer prompt; superlative mest prompt)

  1. quick and punctual; prompt

References[edit]