ready

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English redy, redi, rædiȝ, iredi, ȝerǣdi, alteration ( +‎ -y) of earlier irēd, irede, ȝerād ‎(ready, prepared), from Old English rǣde, ġerǣde (also ġerȳde) ("prepared, prompt, ready, ready for riding (horse), mounted (on a horse), skilled, simple, easy"), from Proto-Germanic *garaidijaz, *raidijaz, from base *raidaz ‎(ready), from Proto-Indo-European *rēydʰ-, *rēy- ‎(to count, put in order, arrange, make comfortable) and also probably conflated with Proto-Indo-European *reydʰ- ‎(to ride) in the sense of "set to ride, able or fit to go, ready". Cognate with Scots readie, reddy ‎(ready, prepared), West Frisian ree ‎(ready), Dutch gereed ‎(ready), German bereit ‎(ready), Danish rede ‎(ready), Swedish redo ‎(ready, fit, prepared), Icelandic greiður ‎(easy, light), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐍂𐌰𐌹𐌸𐍃 ‎(garaiþs, arranged, ordered).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ready ‎(comparative readier, superlative readiest)

  1. Prepared for immediate action or use.
    The troops are ready for battle.  The porridge is ready to serve.
  2. Inclined; apt to happen.
  3. Liable at any moment.
    The seed is ready to sprout.
  4. Not slow or hesitating; quick in action or perception of any kind; dexterous; prompt; easy; expert.
    a ready apprehension;  ready wit;  a ready writer or workman
    • Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
      [] whose temper was ready, through surly
    • Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859)
      ready in devising expedients
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
      Molly the dairymaid came a little way from the rickyard, and said she would pluck the pigeon that very night after work. She was always ready to do anything for us boys; and we could never quite make out why they scolded her so for an idle hussy indoors. It seemed so unjust. Looking back, I recollect she had very beautiful brown eyes.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      The [Washington] Post's proprietor through those turbulent [Watergate] days, Katharine Graham, held a double place in Washington’s hierarchy: at once regal Georgetown hostess and scrappy newshound, ready to hold the establishment to account.
  5. Offering itself at once; at hand; opportune; convenient.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      the readiest way
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      A sapling pine he wrenched from out the ground, / The readiest weapon that his fury found.

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Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

ready ‎(third-person singular simple present readies, present participle readying, simple past and past participle readied)

  1. To make prepared for action.

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Noun[edit]

ready ‎(countable and uncountable, plural readies)

  1. (slang) ready money; cash
    • Arbuthnot
      Lord Strut was not flush in ready, either to go to law, or to clear old debts.

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