ree

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See also: REE, r'ee, and re'e

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ree ‎(plural rees)

  1. Alternative form of rei

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rei, reh, reoh, from Old English hrēoh(rough, fierce, wild, angry, disturbed, troubled, stormy, tempestuous), from Proto-Germanic *hreuhaz(bad, wild), from Proto-Indo-European *krewh₂-(raw meat, fresh blood). Cognate with Scots ree, rae, ray(ree), Old Saxon hrē(evil, bad, angry), Gothic 𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌷𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽(rauhtjan, to become angry, rage against). Related to Old English hrēaw(raw, uncooked). More at raw.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • rie (Scotland)

Adjective[edit]

ree ‎(comparative reer or more ree, superlative reest or most ree)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Wild; fierce; outrageous; overexcited; frenzied; delirious; crazy.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Befuddled with liquor; half-drunk; tipsy.

Noun[edit]

ree ‎(plural rees)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) A state of befuddlement; intoxication.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) A state of great excitement or frenzy.

Verb[edit]

ree ‎(third-person singular simple present rees, present participle reeing, simple past and past participle reed)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To become extremely excited; fly into a rage.
  2. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To drive into a state of excitement; fire with enthusiasm.

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare riddle(a sieve).

Verb[edit]

ree ‎(third-person singular simple present rees, present participle reeing, simple past and past participle reed)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) To riddle; to sift; to separate or throw off.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ree f, n ‎(plural reeën, diminutive reetje n)

  1. roe

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

re- +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

ree

  1. again

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ree f pl

  1. feminine plural of reo

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ree m

  1. vocative singular of reus

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *rīxs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs(ruler, king).

Noun[edit]

ree m ‎(genitive singular ree, plural reeghyn or reeaghyn)

  1. (nobility, chess, card games, draughts) king

Derived terms[edit]