roe

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See also: Roe, ROE, roé, róe, and

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rowe, rowne, roun, rawne, from Old English *hrogn(spawn, fish eggs, roe), from Proto-Germanic *hrugnaz, *hrugną(spawn, roe), from Proto-Indo-European *krek-((frog) spawn). Cognate with Dutch roge(roe), German Low German Rögen(roe), German Rogen(roe), Danish rogn, ravn(roe), Swedish rom(roe), Icelandic hrogn(roe), Lithuanian kurkulaĩ(frog spawn), Russian кряк(krjak, frog spawn).[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

roe ‎(uncountable)

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  1. The eggs of fish.
  2. The sperm of certain fish.
  3. The ovaries of certain crustaceans.
Quotations[edit]
  • 1988 : It was quite flavourless, except that, where its innards had been imperfectly removed, silver traces of roe gave it an unpleasant bitterness. - Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming Pool Library, (Penguin Books, paperback edition, 40)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wolfgang Pfeifer, ed., Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Deutschen, s.v. “Rogen” (Munich: Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag, 2005).

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ro, roa, from Old English , rāha, from Proto-Germanic *raihą (compare Saterland Frisian Räi, Dutch ree, German Reh), from *róyko-, from Proto-Indo-European *rey-(spotted, streaked) (compare Irish riabh ‘stripe, streak’, Latvian ràibs ‘spotted’, Russian рябо́й(rjabój, mottled fur).

Noun[edit]

roe ‎(plural roe or roes)

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  1. A small, nimble Eurasian deer, Capreolus capreolus, with no visible tail, a white rump patch, and a reddish summer coat that turns grey in winter, the male having short three-pointed antlers.
  2. A mottled appearance of light and shade in wood, especially in mahogany.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortened form of roede, with regular loss of -de. From Proto-Germanic *rōdō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roe f, m ‎(plural roes, diminutive roetje n)

  1. Alternative form of roede
  2. bundle of twigs, especially in Sinterklaas folklore

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French roe < Latin rota.

Noun[edit]

roe f (plural roes)

  1. wheel (cylindrical device)

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the noun ro

Verb[edit]

roe ‎(imperative ro, present tense roer, passive roes, simple past and past participle roa or roet, present participle roende)

  1. (often reflexive, with seg) to calm (ned / down), to soothe

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the noun ro

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

roe ‎(present tense roar, past tense roa, past participle roa, passive infinitive roast, present participle roande, imperative roe/ro)

  1. (often reflexive, with seg) to calm (ned / down), to soothe

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin rota.

Noun[edit]

roe f ‎(oblique plural roes, nominative singular roe, nominative plural roes)

  1. wheel (cylindrical device)

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

roe

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of roer.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of roer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of roer.