roer

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See also: rœr and rör

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch roer, roeder, from Middle Dutch roeder, from Old Dutch *ruother, from Proto-Germanic *rōþrą.

Noun[edit]

roer (plural roers, diminutive roertjie)

  1. A rifle, a gun.
  2. A rudder.

Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rōdere, present active infinitive of rōdō, from Proto-Indo-European *rōd-, contracted o-grade form of *reh₁d- (to gnaw, scrape, scratch).

Verb[edit]

roer

  1. to gnaw (to bite something persistently)

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From ro (to row) +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /roːər/, [ˈʁoːˀɐ]

Noun[edit]

roer c (singular definite roeren, plural indefinite roere)

  1. rower
  2. oarsman, oarswoman
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /roːər/, [ˈʁoːɐ]

Noun[edit]

roer c

  1. indefinite plural of roe (beet, rutabaga, turnip)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /rur/, [ruːr]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: roer
  • Rhymes: -ur

Etymology 1[edit]

From a contraction of earlier roeder, from Middle Dutch roeder, from Old Dutch *ruother, from Proto-Germanic *rōþrą.

Cognate with West Frisian roer, German Ruder, English rudder.

Noun[edit]

roer n (plural roeren, diminutive roertje n)

  1. A boat's wheel
  2. A rudder, device to steer a vessel
  3. (figurative) (used absolutely, with the definite article: het roer) control
    aan het roer staan — to have (situation, etc.) under control, to be in charge
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: roer
  • Russian: руль (rulʹ)

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

roer n (plural roeren, diminutive roertje n)

  1. (historical) light musket, matchlock gun
    Synonym: vuurroer
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

roer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roeren
  2. imperative of roeren

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese roer, from Latin rōdere, present active infinitive of rōdō, from Proto-Indo-European *rōd-, contracted o-grade form of *reh₁d- (to gnaw, scrape, scratch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

roer (first-person singular present roio, first-person singular preterite roín, past participle roído)

  1. (transitive) to gnaw, to nibble, to bite
    • 1555, Hernán Núñez, Refranes en Romance:
      As veces ruyn gadela roy boa correa
      Sometimes a bad bitch gnaws a good leash
    • 1697, several authors, Fiestas Minervales. Santiago: Antonio Frayz, page 34:
      Dubido do que farei / Para saír desta enfeita / Maxino roer as uñas / E bourar mui ben na testa
      I'm dubious on what to do / To exit of this preparation / I imagine myself biting my nails / And ably beating my head
  2. (transitive) to corrode

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • hai que roelo (we/you/they must endure it, literally (you/we) should gnaw it)

References[edit]

  • roer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • roer” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • roer” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • roer” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

German rowing eight EK 1964.jpg

Etymology 1[edit]

From ro (verb) +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

roer m (definite singular roeren, indefinite plural roere, definite plural roerne)

  1. an oarsman, rower

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

roer

  1. present of roe

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese roer, from Latin rōdere, present active infinitive of rōdō, from Proto-Indo-European *rōd-, contracted o-grade form of *reh₁d- (to gnaw, scrape, scratch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

roer (first-person singular present indicative roo, past participle roído)

  1. to gnaw
    • 1917, Raul Brandão, Húmus, 2ª edição
      Ouço sempre o mesmo ruido de morte que devagar roe e persiste...
      I always hear the same slowly gnawing and persistent noise of death...
    O rato está roendo.The mouse is gnawing.
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of roer
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of roer
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of roer
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of roer

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish roer, from Latin rōdere, present active infinitive of rōdō (whence English rodent), from Proto-Indo-European *rōd-, contracted o-grade form of *reh₁d- (to gnaw, scrape, scratch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

roer (first-person singular present roo, first-person singular preterite roí, past participle roído)

  1. to gnaw
  2. to pick at
  3. to wear down

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]