rifle

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English[edit]

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a rifle (Mauser K98)

Etymology[edit]

Middle English, from Old French rifler ‎(to scrape off, plunder), from Old Low Franconian *riffilōn (compare obsolete Dutch rijffelen ‎(to scrape), Old English geriflian ‎(to wrinkle), Middle High German riffeln ‎(to scratch, heckle (flax)), Old High German riffilōn ‎(to saw, rub apart)), frequentative of Proto-Germanic *rīfaną (compare Old Norse rifa ‎(to tear, break)). More at rive.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle ‎(plural rifles)

  1. A long firearm firing a single projectile, usually with a rifled barrel to improve accuracy.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Still, a dozen men with rifles, and cartridges to match, stayed behind when they filed through a white aldea lying silent amid the cane, and the Sin Verguenza swung into slightly quicker stride.
  2. A strip of wood covered with emery or a similar material, used for sharpening scythes.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

rifle ‎(third-person singular simple present rifles, present participle rifling, simple past and past participle rifled)

  1. to search with intent to steal; to ransack, pillage or plunder.
  2. To scan many items (especially papers) in a set, quickly. (See also riffle[2])
    She made a mess when she rifled through the stack of papers, looking for the title document.
  3. To add a spiral to the interior of a gun bore to make a fired bullet spin in flight to improve range and accuracy.
  4. To strike something with great power.
    • 2010 December 28, Marc Vesty, “Stoke 0 - 2 Fulham”, BBC:
      Davies's cross was headed away from danger by Robert Huth, only for Baird to take the ball in his stride and rifle his right-footed effort towards the corner from the edge of the box.
  5. (intransitive) To commit robbery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)
  6. (transitive) To strip of goods; to rob; to pillage.
    • Shakespeare
      Stand, sir, and throw us that you have about ye: / If not, we'll make you sit and rifle you.
  7. To seize and bear away by force; to snatch away; to carry off.
    • Alexander Pope
      Time shall rifle every youthful grace.
  8. To raffle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Webster to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From American English rifle (19th century).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle m ‎(plural rifles)

  1. rifle (carabine)

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

rifle

  1. first-person singular present indicative of rifler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of rifler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of rifler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of rifler
  5. second-person singular imperative of rifler

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English rifle, from Middle English, from Old French rifler ‎(to scrape off, plunder), from Old Low Franconian *rifillon, frequentative of Proto-Germanic *rīfaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle m ‎(plural rifles)

  1. rifle

Synonyms[edit]