rifle

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See also: riflé

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
a rifle (Mauser FR-8)

Etymology[edit]

Originally short for “rifled gun”, referring to the spiral grooves inside the barrel. From Middle English, from Old French rifler (to scrape off, plunder), from Old Dutch *riffilōn (compare archaic Dutch rijfelen (to scrape), Old English geriflian (to wrinkle)), frequentative of Proto-Germanic *rīfaną (compare Old Norse rífa (to tear, break)). More at rive.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹaɪfəl/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

rifle (plural rifles)

  1. (weaponry) A shouldered firearm with a long, rifled barrel to improve range and accuracy.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Still, a dozen men with rifles, and cartridges to match, stayed behind when they filed through a white aldea lying silent amid the cane, and the Sin Verguenza swung into slightly quicker stride.
    • 1995, Klein, Richard, “Introduction”, in Cigarettes are sublime, Paperback edition, Durham: Duke University Press, published 1993, →ISBN, OCLC 613939086, page 8:
      In the June days of 1848 Baudelaire reports seeing revolutionaries (he might have been one of them) going through the streets of Paris with rifles, shooting all the clocks.
  2. (military, usually in the plural, dated) A rifleman.
  3. (weaponry) An artillery piece with a rifled barrel.
  4. A strip of wood covered with emery or a similar material, used for sharpening scythes.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: rifle
  • French: rifle
  • Japanese: ライフル (raifuru)
  • Korean: 라이플 (raipeul)
  • Portuguese: rifle
  • Spanish: rifle

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rifle (third-person singular simple present rifles, present participle rifling, simple past and past participle rifled)

  1. (intransitive) To quickly search through many items (such as papers, the contents of a drawer, a pile of clothing). (See also riffle[2])
    She made a mess when she rifled through the stack of papers, looking for the title document.
  2. (intransitive) To commit robbery or theft.
  3. (transitive) To search with intent to steal; to ransack, pillage or plunder.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To strip of goods; to rob; to pillage.
  5. (transitive) To seize and bear away by force; to snatch away; to carry off.
  6. (transitive) To add a spiral groove to a gun bore to make a fired bullet spin in flight in order to improve range and accuracy.
  7. (transitive) To cause (a projectile, as a rifle bullet) to travel in a flat ballistic trajectory.
    • 2010 December 28, Marc Vesty, “Stoke 0 - 2 Fulham”, in BBC[3]:
      Davies's cross was headed away from danger by Robert Huth, only for Baird to take the ball in his stride and rifle his right-footed effort towards the corner from the edge of the box.
    • 2011 Fighting for Gold: The Story of Canada's Sledge Hockey Paralympic Gold by Lorna Schultz Schultz Nicholson
      But a Norwegian player rifled off a point shot that sailed into the back of the net.
  8. (intransitive) To move in a flat ballistic trajectory (as a rifle bullet).
    • 2014: Lights of Summer: The Run for Glory by Alexander Rebelle
      The ball rifled off the bat.
  9. (obsolete, transitive) To dispose of in a raffle.
  10. (obsolete, intransitive) To engage in a raffle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. Webster to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • rifle at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • rifle in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English rifle.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From American English rifle (19th century).

Noun[edit]

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle (carabine)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

rifle

  1. first-person singular present indicative of rifler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of rifler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of rifler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of rifler
  5. second-person singular imperative of rifler

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Apparently from Middle Low German or Low German riffel, but compare Danish riffel.

Noun[edit]

rifle f or m (definite singular rifla or riflen, indefinite plural rifler, definite plural riflene)

  1. (firearm) a rifle

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

As above.

Noun[edit]

rifle f (definite singular rifla, indefinite plural rifler, definite plural riflene)

  1. (firearm) a rifle

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English rifle, from Middle English, from Old French rifler (to scrape off, plunder), from Old Low Franconian Old Dutch *rifillon, frequentative of Proto-Germanic *rīfaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle
    Synonyms: escopeta, espingarda, fuzil, refle

Further reading[edit]

  • rifle” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rifle.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rifle m (plural rifles)

  1. rifle
    Synonym: fusil

Further reading[edit]