ned

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Ned, NED, -ned, and -néd

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown. The suggested initialism from "non-educated delinquent" is a backronym and folk etymology. Several other suggestions include a contraction of ne'er-do-well, neanderthal, or some kind of relationship with Teddy Boy although its use much predates the 1950s origin of that phrase. Ostensibly unrelated to "Ned" as a diminutive of the personal name "Edward" but the Scottish use of 'ned' for hooligan or lout is cited by the Oxford English Dictionary as dating from the early 19th century. The OED also attributes a possible derivation from the 'Edward' diminutive.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɛd/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ned (plural neds)

  1. (Scotland, slang, derogatory, offensive) A person, usually a youth, of low social standing and education, a violent disposition and with a particular style of dress (typically sportswear or Burberry), speech and behaviour.
    • 2007 (Scotland), RecordView in Daily Record, 14 Feb 07, Scottish Daily Record and Sunday Mail, p. 8:
      The mindless behaviour of drunken neds and nuisance neighbours brings misery to tens of thousands of honest folk.

Synonyms[edit]

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Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse niðr, from Proto-Germanic *niþer, from Proto-Indo-European *niter. Cognates include Faroese and Icelandic niður, English nether, Dutch neder, German nieder.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɛð/, [neð̠˕ˠ]

Preposition[edit]

ned

  1. down

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From , by analogy with e/ed.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈned/
  • Rhymes: -ed
  • Hyphenation: néd

Conjunction[edit]

ned

  1. (poetic) Rare form of used before a vowel
    • c. 1260s, Brunetto Latini, Il tesoretto [The Treasure], collected in Raccolta di rime antiche toscane: Volume primo, Palermo: Giuseppe Assenzio, published 1817, lines 1–5, page 9:
      Al valente Signore, ¶ Di cui non so migliore ¶ Sù la terra trovare; ¶ Che non avete pare ¶ Nè ’n pace, ned in guerra
      To the valiant Lord, better of whom I can not find anyone on earth, for you have no peer, neither in peace nor in war

References[edit]

  • ned in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Upper Sorbian hnyd and Czech hned.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ned

  1. immediately, straightaway

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ner (no longer listed; obsolete)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse niðr, from Proto-Germanic *niþer.

Adverb[edit]

ned

  1. down (from a higher to a lower level)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

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Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse niðr, from Proto-Germanic *niþer.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ned

  1. down (from a higher to a lower level)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nēd f

  1. Alternative form of nīed

Scots[edit]

Noun[edit]

ned (plural neds)

  1. (slang, derogatory) ned

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ner (somewhat informal)
  • neder (archaic except in some compounds)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse niðr, from Proto-Germanic *niþer, from Proto-Indo-European *niter. Cognates include English nether, Faroese and Icelandic niður, German nieder and Dutch neder.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ned (not comparable)

  1. (somewhat formal) down

Usage notes[edit]

The forms ned and ner are often, but not always, interchangeable. The form ned is more formal and is especially found in compounds of more formal nature, whereas ner is more common as a word on its own. For instance the formal word nedlägga (to discontinue, shut down) vs. its informal equivalent lägga ner. Some compounds can use either form, e.g. nedladdning (download) (more formal) or nerladdning (less formal). Some compounds only use ned, e.g. nedlåtande (condescending).

In a few compounds, the otherwise archaic form neder is used, e.g. nederbörd (precipitation) or nedervåning (ground floor).

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Anagrams[edit]