coral

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See also: Coral

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French coral (French corail), from Latin corallium, from Ancient Greek κοράλλιον (korállion, coral). Probably ultimately of Semitic origin,[1] compare Hebrew גּוֹרָל(goral, small pebble), Arabic جَرَل(jaral, small stone), originally referring to the red variety found in the Mediterranean. Since ancient times, a common folk etymology, accepted by some earlier scholars, connected the word instead to Ancient Greek κόρη (kórē) (referring to Medusa).[2][3][4] Beekes mentions both theories and considers the Semitic one convincing.[5]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coral (countable and uncountable, plural corals)

  1. (uncountable) A hard substance made of the limestone skeletons of marine polyps.
  2. (countable) A colony of marine polyps.
  3. (countable) A somewhat yellowish pink colour, the colour of red coral.
    coral colour:  
  4. The ovaries of a cooked lobster; so called from their colour.
  5. (historical) A piece of coral, usually fitted with small bells and other appurtenances, used by children as a plaything.
    • 1859, Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White[1]:
      On the very chair which I used to occupy when I was at work Marian was sitting now, with the child industriously sucking his coral upon her lap.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coral (not comparable)

  1. Made of coral.
  2. Having the yellowish pink colour of coral.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lewy, Heinrich (1895) Die semitischen Fremdwörter im Griechischen (in German), Berlin: R. Gaertner’s Verlagsbuchhandlung, pages 18–19
  2. ^ See e.g. Lithica (one of the Orphic poems), 510-610, and Pliny the Elder, Natural History, book XXXII, line 11.
  3. ^ C. W. King, The Natural History of Gems or Decorative Stones, 1867, Bell & Daldy, London, pp. 100–101.
  4. ^ Liddell and Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, Harpers & Brothers, New York, 1846, p. 792.
  5. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective[edit]

coral (masculine and feminine plural corals)

  1. strong, close (relationship)

Etymology 2[edit]

cor (choir) +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

coral (masculine and feminine plural corals)

  1. choral

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corals)

  1. chorus music
  2. chorale

Etymology 3[edit]

Latin corallium, from Ancient Greek κοράλλιον (korállion).

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corals)

  1. coral (organism)

Galician[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese coral, borrowed from Old French coral, from Latin corallium, from Ancient Greek κοράλλιον (korállion).

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corais)

  1. (zoology) coral
    • 1395, Antonio López Ferreiro (ed.), Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica, page 160:
      mando a miña Neta Tareija sanches todo o aliofar et coraes que eu ey et os esmaltes et o meu Reliquario esmaltado et a miña Cunca de plata dourada et as miñas doas de ouro
      I send to my granddaughter Tareixa Sanchez all of my pearls and corals, and the enamels, and my enamelled relicary and my gilded silver bowl and my beads of gold
  2. coral (color)
  3. roe (the eggs or ovaries of certain crustaceans)
    Synonym: míllaras
  4. sea fan (Eunicella verrucosa)

Etymology 2[edit]

coro (choir) +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

coral m or f (plural corais)

  1. choral

Noun[edit]

coral f (plural corais)

  1. chorale

References[edit]

  • coral” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • coral” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • coral” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • coral” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • coral” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French coral, from Old French corallium, from Ancient Greek κοράλλιον (korállion).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corales)

  1. coral
    • c. 1250, Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 14v.
      DEl dozeno grado del ſigno de tauro es la piedra aque dizen coral negro.
      Of the twelfth degree of the sign of Taurus is the stone they call black coral.

Descendants[edit]

  • Ladino: koral
  • Spanish: coral

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

coro +‎ -al.

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corais)

  1. choir (group of singers)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish coral, from Old French coral, from Latin corallium, from Ancient Greek κοράλλιον (korállion).

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corales)

  1. (zoology) coral
  2. (botany) coral vine (Kennedia coccinea)

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

coro (choir) +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

coral (plural corales)

  1. choral

Noun[edit]

coral m (plural corales)

  1. chorale

References[edit]