marine

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Marine and mariné

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Recorded since c.1420 as Middle English marin, borrowed from Middle French marin, from Old French, from Latin marinus (of the sea), itself from mare (sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (body of water, lake) (cognate with Old English mere (sea, lake, pool, pond), Dutch meer, German Meer, all from Proto-Germanic *mari).

The modern pronunciation is presumably due to the influence of modern French marine, feminine singular of marin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /məˈɹiːn/
    • Hyphenation: ma‧rine
    • Rhymes: -iːn
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈmæɹɪn/, /məˈɹaɪn/

Adjective[edit]

marine (comparative more marine, superlative most marine)

  1. Belonging to or characteristic of the sea; existing or found in the sea; formed or produced by the sea.
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why many of them burn so readily. Any organism that could unlock and use that energy would do well in the Anthropocene. Terrestrial bacteria and fungi which can manage this trick are already familiar to experts in the field. Dr Mincer and Dr Amaral-Zettler found evidence of them on their marine plastic, too.
  2. Relating to or connected with the sea (in operation, scope, etc.), especially as pertains to shipping, a navy, or naval forces.
  3. Used or adapted for use at sea.
  4. (zoology) Inhabiting the high seas; oceanic; pelagic. (distinguished from maritime or littoral)
  5. (obsolete) Belonging to or situated at the seaside; maritime.

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

marine (plural marines)

  1. (military, nautical) A soldier, normally a member of a marine corps, trained to serve on board or from a ship
    He was a marine in World War II.
  2. (capitalised in the plural): A marine corps.
    He fought with the Marines in World War II.
  3. A painting representing some marine subject.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Tokelauan: malini, maligi

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

marine (third-person singular simple present marines, present participle marining, simple past and past participle marined)

  1. To adapt for use in a marine environment.
    • 1938, Pacific Motor Boat - Volume 31, page 54:
      The most popular model is the Chrysler 75 marined motor. This motor comes fully marined and fully reconditioned at $ 225 at Oakland.
    • 1956, Fishing Gazette - Volume 73, page 94:
      Frank Kennedy Sr. and Jr. watch mechanic make an adjustment on one of the two Minneapolis-Moline industrial diesel engines being marined by Kennedy-Morris Co., Biloxi, Miss.
    • 1959, SAE Technical Paper Series, page 70:
      Marine engines, until 1949, included many truck engine blocks marined up.
    • 1964, “New I-H Diesel Adds Two Knots to Dragger's Speed”, in Western Fisheries, volume 68, page 101:
      First was in Jimmy Pope's “Willow Point,” and both units were marined in Vancouver by Nolan Lowe, in his plant at 1925 W. Georgia St., Vancouver.
    • 2010, S. S. Dara, S. D. Shete, S. Chand’s Applied Chemistry Volume - 2, page 31:
      This type of protection is of particular value in case of buried structures such as tanks and pipelines, transmission line towers, marined piers, laid-up ships etc.
  2. To temporarily inundate with water and/or other marine substances.
    • 1893, Edgar Saltus, Madam Sapphira: A Fifth Avenue Story, page 97:
      "And Baptiste? It is there he is. The trunks of Monsieru to the number 12, and let it not loiter. And hey!" she cried with much haughtiness to an interloper who had opened the cab-door and was now officious in the transfer of the luggage, “ And hey, species of calf's head marined in mud, go, I pray you, a little that way and see if I there am."
    • 1937, Amadeus William Grabau, Palæozoic Formations in the Light of the Pulsation Theory, page 271:
      As will be seen from this very sparing representation of indeterminable brachiopods etc. , this fauna can hardly be regarded as indicating marine submergence, for the shells of these organisms could just as readily have been swept in with the graptolites during the periods of marining.
    • 2006, Robin Becker, “Rain”, in Domain of Perfect Affection:
      I decided to love its drenching monopolies for it was like this: cartels of imported rain marined the yard with brackish-water jellies.
  3. To equip (a boat) with sailors and other personnel required for an ocean voyage.
    • 1863, William Kirby, ‎William Spence, An Introduction to Entomology, page 569:
      And now, having marined this Royal Harry with as large a complement of men as I could muster, shall launch her.
    • 1903, Captain Marryat, Rattlin, the Reefer, page 188:
      Just as we had got the ship's head towards the stranger , with every stitch of canvas crowded upon her , and the eight-oared cutter, manned, armed, and marined, towing astern, they had got the captured West Indiaman before the wind, with everything set.
    • 1913, Lumber World Review - Volume 24, page 33:
      The American coastwise laws provide that only American vessels , marined by American sailors at from $40 to $160 per month, can engage in the coastwise trade between states

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French marine, from Latin marinus, derived from mare (sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /maːˈri.nə/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧ri‧ne
  • Rhymes: -inə

Noun[edit]

marine f (plural marines, diminutive marinetje n)

  1. (navigation) A navy
  2. (military) An armed navy (naval branch of armed forces)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From marin, from Latin marīnus, derived from mare (sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

marine

  1. feminine singular of marin

Noun[edit]

marine f (plural marines)

  1. navy

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

marine m (plural marines)

  1. Marine (member of the United States Marine Corps)

Verb[edit]

marine

  1. inflection of mariner:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular present imperative

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English marine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

marine m (invariable)

  1. marine (type of soldier)

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈri.ne/
  • Rhymes: -ine
  • Hyphenation: ma‧rì‧ne

Adjective[edit]

marine f

  1. feminine plural of marino

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈri.ne/
  • Rhymes: -ine
  • Hyphenation: ma‧rì‧ne

Noun[edit]

marine f

  1. plural of marina

References[edit]

  1. ^ marine in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

marine

  1. Rōmaji transcription of マリネ

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

marīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of marīnus

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

marine

  1. definite singular of marin
  2. plural of marin

Etymology 2[edit]

From French marine

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Noun[edit]

marine m (definite singular marinen, indefinite plural mariner, definite plural marinene)

  1. a navy
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

marine

  1. definite singular of marin
  2. plural of marin

Etymology 2[edit]

From French marine

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

marine m (definite singular marinen, indefinite plural marinar, definite plural marinane)

  1. a navy
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

marine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of marinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of marinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of marinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of marinar

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

marine m or f (plural marines)

  1. marine (soldier of USA or UK)

Verb[edit]

marine

  1. inflection of marinar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]