laut

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See also: Laut and ļaut

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

laut

  1. lute

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lautō, *lautiz. Compare Old Norse laut and Old Swedish lȫt. Cognate to Votic lautta

Noun[edit]

laut ‎(genitive lauda, partitive lauta)

  1. barn
  2. stable

Declension[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German lūt, akin to Old Saxon hlūd, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

laut ‎(comparative lauter, superlative am lautesten)

  1. loud, noisy

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

laut (+ dative or genitive)

  1. according to

Usage notes[edit]

The preposition laut governs either the dative or genitive case. Usage with dative has been more common since 1900:

  • laut einem Bericht (also: eines Berichts)according to a report.

The dative case is always used for plural nouns not preceded by an article, determiner, or adjective:

  • laut Berichten (not: Berichte)according to reports.

An isolated noun of the strong declension remains uninflected in the singular:

  • laut Bericht (not: Berichts)according to the report.

Synonyms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay laut, from Proto-Malayic *laut (compare Malay laut), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *laud (compare Ilocano laud(west)), from Proto-Austronesian *laud.

Noun[edit]

laut

  1. sea (body of water)

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *laut (compare Indonesian laut), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *laud (compare Ilocano laud(west)), from Proto-Austronesian *laud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

laut

  1. sea (body of water)