laut

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See also: Laut and ļaut

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

laut inan

  1. lute

Brunei Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /laut/
  • Hyphenation: la‧ut

Noun[edit]

laut

  1. sea (body of water)

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lautō, *lautiz. Compare Old Norse laut and Old Swedish lȫt. Cognate to Votic lautta

Noun[edit]

laut (genitive lauda, partitive lauta)

  1. barn (for animals), coop

Declension[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German lūt, akin to Old Saxon hlūd, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /laʊ̯t/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

laut (comparative lauter, superlative am lautesten)

  1. loud, noisy

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

laut (+ dative or genitive)

  1. according to

Usage notes[edit]

The preposition laut governs either the dative or genitive case. Usage with dative has been more common since 1900:

  • laut einem Bericht (also: eines Berichts)according to a report.

The dative case is always used for plural nouns not preceded by an article, determiner, or adjective:

  • laut Berichten (not: Berichte)according to reports.

An isolated noun of the strong declension remains uninflected in the singular:

  • laut Bericht (not: Berichts)according to the report.

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

laut

  1. (also Early New High German, rare after that period, now archaic) third-person singular present indicative of lauten; Alternative form of lautet

Hunsrik[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

laut (comparative lauter, superlative lautest)

  1. loud

Declension[edit]

Declension of laut
masculine feminine neuter plural
Weak inflection nominative laut laut laut laute
accusative laute laut laut laute
dative laute laute laute laute
Strong inflection nominative lauter laute lautes laute
accusative laute laute lautes laute
dative lautem lauter lautem laute

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

laut f (genitive singular lautar, nominative plural lautir)

  1. hollow, depression

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay laut, from Proto-Malayic *laut (compare Malay laut), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *lahud (compare Ilocano laud (west)), from Proto-Austronesian *lahud.

Noun[edit]

laut (plural, first-person possessive lautku, second-person possessive lautmu, third-person possessive lautnya)

  1. sea (body of water)

Derived terms[edit]


Kapampangan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *lahud (compare Ilocano laud (west)), from Proto-Austronesian *lahud.

Noun[edit]

laut

  1. gulf
  2. deep sea

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayic *laut, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *lahud, from Proto-Austronesian *lahud.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

laut (Jawi spelling لاءوت‎, informal 1st possessive lautku, impolite 2nd possessive lautmu, 3rd possessive lautnya)

  1. sea (body of water)

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: laut

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

laut

  1. past of lyta

Sundanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

laut

  1. Romanization of ᮜᮅᮒ᮪

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Finnish lautta.

Noun[edit]

laut

  1. raft

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lautō.

Noun[edit]

laut f

  1. Farmyard; place, space, land, outside and at the cowshed, where the cattle can freely go to and fro, and from where they are driven to the pasture; cowpath next to the cowshed.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]