loud

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See also: Loud

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English loud, lud, from Old English hlūd ‎(loud, noisy, sounding, sonorous), from Proto-Germanic *hlūþaz ‎(heard), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewtos ‎(heard, famous), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- ‎(to hear). Akin to Scots loud, lowd ‎(loud), West Frisian lûd ‎(loud), Dutch luid ‎(loud), Low German lud ‎(loud), German laut ‎(loud), Irish clú ‎(repute), Welsh clywed ‎(heard), clod ‎(praise), Latin inclutus ‎(famous), Tocharian A/B klots/klautso 'ear', klyostär 'heard', Ancient Greek κλυτός ‎(klutós, famous), Albanian quaj ‎(to name, call), shquar ‎(famous, notorious), Old Armenian լու ‎(lu, the act of hearing), Old Church Slavonic слава ‎(slava, glory), слово ‎(slovo, word), Sanskrit श्रव ‎(śráva, glory). More at listen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

loud ‎(comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. (of a sound) Of great intensity.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      Mr. Cooke at once began a tirade against the residents of Asquith for permitting a sandy and generally disgraceful condition of the roads. So roundly did he vituperate the inn management in particular, and with such a loud flow of words, that I trembled lest he should be heard on the veranda.
    Turn that music down; it's too loud.
  2. (of a person, thing, event, etc.) Noisy.
    • Bible, Proverbs vii. 11
      She is loud and stubborn.
    a loud party that went on all night
  3. (of a person, event, etc.) Not subtle or reserved, brash.
  4. (of clothing, decorations, etc.) Having unpleasantly and tastelessly contrasting colours or patterns; gaudy.
    a loud style of dress;  loud colors

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

loud ‎(comparative more loud, superlative most loud)

  1. Loudly.

Anagrams[edit]