alt

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See also: Alt, alt-, atl, ált, and ált.

Contents

English[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

alt

  1. Abbreviation of alternative.
  2. Abbreviation of altitude.
  3. A state of excitement, conveyed by a high-pitched voice.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, The History of Clarissa Harlowe: In a Series of Letters:
      I was, however, glad at my heart, that Mrs. Moore came up so seasonably with notice, that dinner was ready. The fair fugitive was all in alt. She had the game in her own hands; and by giving me so good an excuse for withdrawing, I had time to strengthen myself; the Captain had time to come; and the Lady to cool.
    • c. 1875, Charles James Lever, The Dodd Family Abroad:
      "Not," added she, as her eyes glittered with anger, and she sidled near the door for an exit—" not but, in the estimation of others, you may be quite an Adonis—a young gentleman of wit and fashion —a beau of the first water; I have no doubt Mary Jane thinks so— you old wretch!" This, in alt, and a bang of the door that brought down an oil picture that hung over it, closed the scene.
    • 1891, Douglas William Jerrold, Tales: now first collected, page 113:
      He had no wish to pry or listen; but if people would talk in alt, whilst he moved, like a mole, about his business, family matters would cleave the ear which, however it tried, could not be deaf.
    • 2011, Jo Beverly, The Marrying Maid[1], page 50:
      That lady was in alt at Loxsleigh's high station and had spent the morning making inquiries of her friends, which also allowed her to spread the word about her interesting new acquaintance.
  4. (knitting) Abbreviation of alternate.
  5. (music) Abbreviation of alto.
    • 1762, George Colman, The Musical Lady:
      Sop[hy] Moderato! moderato! Madam. Your Ladyship's absolutely in alt. / L[ady] Scr[ape] In alt! Madam? / Sop[hy] Yes, in alt- Give me leave to tell your Ladyship, that you have raised your voice a full octave higher since you came into the room.
    • 1794, Mrs. Bennett (Agnes Maria), Ellen, Countess of Castle Howel: A Novel, volume 1:
      The duet was in alt; one stormed, the other half crying, half scolding, made up in volubility what her aunt possessed in authority, and it was not 'till Lady Meredith had twice raised her mild voice, either party could be silenced.
    • 1857, Anne Manning, Helen and Olga: a Russian tale, page 194:
      And he began, — "Poor insect! born to flutter and to die;" — falling into the second, directly Helen took the first, till he got down to such unreasonable bass that he suddenly gave a shriek in alt that made Olga stop her ears.

Noun[edit]

alt ‎(plural alts)

  1. (Internet, multi-user dungeon) One of a player's alternate or secondary characters.
    • 1996, "Jonobie D. Baker", Survey of MUSHers. (on newsgroup rec.games.mud.tiny)
      Of these alts, how many of them are a gender other than your own?
    • 2000, "KaVir", Code Bases - why release buggy crap? (on newsgroup alt.mud)
      Yes, I have many alts, and no, none of the others have any unusual capitalisation.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus, ultimately of Proto-Indo-European [Term?] origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alt m ‎(feminine alta, masculine plural alts, feminine plural altes)

  1. high

Related terms[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German ald, northern variant of alt. The variation between the stems alt and aal is due to the development -ald--āl-, which occurred only in open syllables.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alt ‎(masculine aale, feminine aal, comparative aaler or ääler or älder, superlative et aalste or äälste or ältste)

  1. (most dialects) old
    Von aale Löck ka’ mer noch jet liehre.
    There’s something to be learnt from old people.
    Dat alt Huus möt mer ens renoviere.
    That old house should be renovated sometime.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The commoner comparation forms were originally aaler, et aalste. Today, those with umlaut are preferred due to influence of German älter, am ältesten.

Related terms[edit]


Crimean Gothic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aldaz.

Adjective[edit]

alt

  1. old
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Alt. Senex.

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

alt m

  1. alto

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(plural alten, diminutive altje n)

  1. alto (musical part)
  2. alto (person or instrument)

Usage notes[edit]

The word "alt" is feminine when it's used to indicate a woman singing or playing the alto part.

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse allr.

Pronoun[edit]

alt n ‎(masculine allur, feminine øll)

  1. all

Declension[edit]

allur a12
Singular (eintal) m (kallkyn) f (kvennkyn) n (hvørkikyn)
Nominative (hvørfall) allur øll alt
Accusative (hvønnfall) allan alla
Dative (hvørjumfall) øllum allari øllum
Genitive (hvørsfall) (als) (allar) (als)
Plural (fleirtal) m (kallkyn) f (kvennkyn) n (hvørkikyn)
Nominative (hvørfall) allir allar øll
Accusative (hvønnfall) allar
Dative (hvørjumfall) øllum
Genitive (hvørsfall) (alla)

Adverb[edit]

alt

  1. all

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin altus.

Adjective[edit]

alt

  1. high

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(plural alts)

  1. top, summit

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German alt, from Proto-Germanic *aldaz, from Proto-Indo-European *altós, *h₂eltós, from *h₂el- ‎(grow, nourish). Compare Dutch oud, Low German old, West Frisian âld, English old.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alt ‎(comparative älter, superlative am ältesten)

  1. old
    Wie alt bist du?
    How old are you?

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • alt in Duden online

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

alt ‎(plural altok)

  1. alto (voice)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative alt altok
accusative altot altokat
dative altnak altoknak
instrumental alttal altokkal
causal-final altért altokért
translative alttá altokká
terminative altig altokig
essive-formal altként altokként
essive-modal
inessive altban altokban
superessive alton altokon
adessive altnál altoknál
illative altba altokba
sublative altra altokra
allative althoz altokhoz
elative altból altokból
delative altról altokról
ablative alttól altoktól
Possessive forms of alt
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. altom altjaim
2nd person sing. altod altjaid
3rd person sing. altja altjai
1st person plural altunk altjaink
2nd person plural altotok altjaitok
3rd person plural altjuk altjaik

See also[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish alt ‎(joint, articulation), from Proto-Celtic *ɸaltom ‎(joint), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- ‎(to fold). Cognate with Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌻𐌸𐌰𐌽 ‎(falþan, to fold) and Ancient Greek πέπλος ‎(péplos, woven cloth).

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(genitive singular ailt, nominative plural ailt)

  1. (anatomy, carpentry) joint; juncture
  2. (anatomy) knuckle
  3. knot (in wood)
  4. hillock
  5. bit (of land, tobacco, etc.)
  6. stumpy person
  7. paragraph; section (of act, etc.)
  8. (grammar, parts of speech, publishing) article; clause
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

alt ‎(present analytic altann, future analytic altfaidh, verbal noun altadh, past participle alta)

  1. (transitive) articulate, joint
Conjugation[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from Italian alto.

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(genitive singular ailt, nominative plural ailt)

  1. (music) alto
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

alt f ‎(genitive singular ailte, nominative plural altanna)

  1. Alternative form of ailt ‎(steep-sided glen; ravine)
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
alt n-alt halt t-alt
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

alt

  1. sometimes

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

alt

  1. already

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin altus, via Italian alto; compare with German Alt.

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(definite singular alten, indefinite plural alter, definite plural altene)

  1. (music) alto; contralto

Etymology 3[edit]

Determiner[edit]

alt

  1. neuter singular of all

Pronoun[edit]

alt

  1. everything, all, anything
    alt kan skje - anything can happen
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adverb[edit]

alt

  1. already

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin altus, via Italian alto; compare with German Alt.

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(definite singular alten, indefinite plural altar, definite plural altane)

  1. (music) alto; contralto

Etymology 3[edit]

Determiner[edit]

alt

  1. neuter singular of all

Pronoun[edit]

alt

  1. everything, all, anything
    alt kan skje - anything can happen

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aldaz ‎(grown-up), from Proto-Indo-European *altós, *h₂eltós, from *h₂el- ‎(grow, nourish). Compare Old Frisian ald, Old English eald, Old Saxon ald, ald, Old High German alt.

Adjective[edit]

alt

  1. old

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *aldaz, whence also Old English ald. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *altós, *h₂eltós, from *h₂el- ‎(grow, nourish). Compare Old Saxon and Old Frisian ald, Old English eald, ald.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alt

  1. old
    mit thên altôn
    with the elders

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

·alt

  1. third-person singular preterite active conjunct of ailid
  2. singular preterite passive conjunct of ailid

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·alt unchanged ·n-alt
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin alter, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂élteros.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alt m, n ‎(feminine singular altă, masculine plural alți, feminine and neuter plural alte)

  1. other

Declension[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(genitive singular uilt, plural altan)

  1. joint
  2. (grammar) article

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

alt m ‎(Cyrillic spelling алт)

  1. (music) an alto

Related terms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [aɫt]
  • Hyphenation: alt

Noun[edit]

alt ‎(definite accusative altı, plural altlar)

  1. bottom

Antonyms[edit]

Declension[edit]


Zipser German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Old High German alt.

Adjective[edit]

alt

  1. old