gold

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See also: Gold, gòld, and gółd

English[edit]

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Chemical element
Au
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Next: mercury (Hg)
A gold nugget.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gold, from Old English gold (gold), from Proto-West Germanic *golþ, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine). Related to yellow; see there for more.

Germanic cognates include Dutch goud, German Gold, Norwegian gull, Swedish guld, and cognates from other Indo-European languages are Latvian zelts, Russian зо́лото (zóloto), Persian زرد(zard, yellow, golden), Sanskrit हिरण्य (hiraṇya).

Noun[edit]

gold (countable and uncountable, plural golds)

  1. (uncountable) A heavy yellow elemental metal of great value, with atomic number 79 and symbol Au.
  2. (countable or uncountable) A coin or coinage made of this material, or supposedly so.
    The pirates were searching for gold.
  3. (uncountable) A deep yellow colour, resembling the metal gold.
    gold:  
    metallic gold:  
  4. (countable) The bullseye of an archery target.
    Daniel hit the gold to win the contest.
  5. (countable) A gold medal.
    France has won three golds and five silvers.
  6. (figuratively) Anything or anyone that is very valuable.
    That food mixer you gave me is absolute gold, mate!
    • 2010, Paul Hendy, Who Killed Simon Peters?:
      Now obviously this meant that I went over my allotted time, but the theatre management didn't mind because I was giving them comedy gold and that's what gets bums on seats.
    • 2012, Victor Pemberton, Leo's Girl:
      Marge Quincey didn't deserve a husband like his dad. He was pure gold, and she wasn't worth a light beside him.
  7. (slang, in the plural) A grill (jewellery worn on front teeth) made of gold.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gold (not generally comparable, comparative golder, superlative goldest)

  1. Made of gold.
    a gold chain
  2. Having the colour of gold.
    gold sticker
    gold socks
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:
      Soon after the arrival of Mrs. Campbell, dinner was announced by Abboye. He came into the drawing room resplendent in his gold-and-white turban. […] His cummerbund matched the turban in gold lines.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess[1]:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
  3. (of commercial services) Premium, superior.
  4. Of a musical recording: having sold 500,000 copies.
    Coordinate term: platinum
    • 2000, Billboard (volume 112, number 20, page 52)
      The album went gold, then platinum, thanks to a second hit single, "It's A Miracle".
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (made of gold, having the colour of gold): golden

Verb[edit]

gold (third-person singular simple present golds, present participle golding, simple past and past participle golded)

  1. To appear or cause to appear golden.
    • 2010, Tanuja Desai Hidier, Born Confused:
      I caught sight of something that seemed the nexus of all that glittered, all that golded: like a hallucination in the traffic's rotary heart, a saried creature giddily swirling her own razored rainbow roundabout, mirrored fabric sending light spinning like saberlike amidst the smoking, choking cars.
    • 2011, Harry Nicholson, Tom Fleck, page 250:
      You are the sun at Noon, that golds the barley, and pulls the bee to the ling on the moor.
    • 2011, D G Compton, A Usual Lunacy:
      Worked wonders, knowing a thing like that. Golded up your hair, even, for all your record said indeterminate. Golded up the whole world, really.
    • 2011, Robert M. Ellis, “Pokhara Lake”, in North Cape: Selected Poems of a Poet Turned Philosopher, page 21:
      But I work still, a dead, unheeding man across the endless interface: wishing I was the sun who golds the lake or the lake, comprehending sun.
    • 2021, Edward Elmer Smith, The Imperial Stars:
      Hair down to my shoulders; waved and liquid-golded. Eyebrows shaved to a different shape and golded. Handle-bar mustache, waxed to points and golded.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From gold master, a copy of the code certified as being ready for release.

Adjective[edit]

gold (not comparable)

  1. (programming, of software) In a finished state, ready for manufacturing.
    • 2004 November, “Half-Life 2 goes gold”, in HWM, page 10:
      The Company confirmed that Half-Life 2, developed by Valve Software, has gone gold with a planned retail street date of November 16, 2004.
    • 2011, Jordan Gray, Unearthed, page 6:
      He felt bone-tired and twitchy, the way he did in the final stages of putting a video-game project together, almost ready to go gold and turn a new game loose on the public.
    • 2011, Jessica Mulligan and Bridgette Patrovsky, quoting Damion Schubert, Developing Online Games: An Insider's Guide, page 221:
      I had coded guilds into M59 over the weekend, shortly before we were supposed to go gold.

Adverb[edit]

gold (not comparable)

  1. of or referring to a gold version of something

Further reading[edit]

  • David Barthelmy (1997–2022), “Gold”, in Webmineral Mineralogy Database.
  • Mindat.org[2], Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, 2000–2022.

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English gold, from Middle English gold, from Old English gold (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

Noun[edit]

gold

  1. gold; a heavy yellow elemental metal of great value, with atomic number 79 and symbol Au
  2. a coin or coinage made of this material, or supposedly so
  3. a bright yellow colour, resembling the metal gold
  4. a gold medal
  5. (fantasy role-playing games board games) miscellaneous unit of currency in fantasy genre

Adjective[edit]

gold

  1. having the colour of gold

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:gold.


Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German golt, from Old High German gold, from Proto-West Germanic *golþ, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold). Cognate with German Gold, English gold.

Noun[edit]

gold n

  1. (Luserna) gold (metal)

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from or related to Old Norse geldr (barren, yielding no milk), from Proto-Germanic *galdaz, *galdijaz (barren, unfruitful), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (to shout, cry).

See also Swedish gall (barren), German galt, gelt (yielding no milk, unfruitful), Old Norse gelda (to castrate).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gold

  1. barren, desolate
  2. sterile (unable to reproduce)
  3. dry, (of a cow) not producing milk
    En gold ko.
    A dry cow.

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of gold
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular gold goldere goldest2
Neuter singular goldt goldere goldest2
Plural golde goldere goldest2
Definite attributive1 golde goldere goldeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gold

  1. singular past indicative of gelden

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gold (gold), from Proto-West Germanic *golþ, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold (plural golds)

  1. gold (metal)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: gold
  • Scots: gowd, goold

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gold (indefinite singular gold, definite singular and plural golde, comparative goldare, indefinite superlative goldast, definite superlative goldaste)

  1. frail, barren

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *golþ, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰĺ̥tom.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold n

  1. gold

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English gold.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold (nominative plural golds)

  1. gold

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English gold.

Noun[edit]

gold m (uncountable)

  1. marigold

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gold old ngold unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “gold”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies