gold

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See also: gòld and Gold

English[edit]

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Chemical element
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A gold nugget.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gold, from Old English gold(gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą(gold) (Compare Dutch goud, German Gold, Swedish guld), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm(gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃-(yellow; gleam; to shine). compare Latvian zelts, Russian зо́лото(zóloto), Persian زرد(zard, yellow, golden), Sanskrit हिरण्य(hiraṇya). More at yellow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold ‎(countable and uncountable, plural golds)

  1. (uncountable) A heavy yellow elemental metal of great value, with atomic number 79 and symbol Au.
  2. (countable) A coin made of this material, or supposedly so.
  3. (countable) A bright yellow colour, resembling the metal gold.
    gold colour:    
  4. (countable) The bullseye of an archery target.
  5. (countable) A gold medal.
    France has won three golds and five silvers.
  6. (figuratively) Anything or anyone considered to be very valuable.
    • 2010, Paul Hendy, Who Killed Simon Peters?
      Now obviously this meant that I went over my allotted time, but the theatre management didn't mind because I was giving them comedy gold and that's what gets bums on seats.
    • 2012, Victor Pemberton, Leo's Girl
      Marge Quincey didn't deserve a husband like his dad. He was pure gold, and she wasn't worth a light beside him.
  7. (fantasy role-playing games, fantasy board games) Miscellaneous unit of currency in fantasy genre.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

gold ‎(not generally comparable, comparative golder, superlative goldest)

  1. Made of gold.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. [] A silver snaffle on a heavy leather watch guard which connected the pockets of his corduroy waistcoat, together with a huge gold stirrup in his Ascot tie, sufficiently proclaimed his tastes.
  2. Having the colour of gold.
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:
      Soon after the arrival of Mrs. Campbell, dinner was announced by Abboye. He came into the drawing room resplendent in his gold-and-white turban. […] His cummerbund matched the turban in gold lines.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess[1]:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
  3. (of commercial services) Premium, superior.
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (made of gold, having the colour of gold): golden

Verb[edit]

gold ‎(third-person singular simple present golds, present participle golding, simple past and past participle golded)

  1. To pyrolyze or burn food until the color begins to change to a light brown, but not as dark as browning

See also[edit]

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Etymology 2[edit]

From gold master, a copy of the code certified as being ready for release.

Adjective[edit]

gold ‎(not comparable)

  1. (programming, of software) In a finished state, ready for manufacturing.
    • 2004 November, “Half-Life 2 goes gold”, in HWM, page 10:
      The Company confirmed that Half-Life 2, developed by Valve Software, has gone gold with a planned retail street date of November 16, 2004.
    • 2011, Jordan Gray, Unearthed, page 6:
      He felt bone-tired and twitchy, the way he did in the final stages of putting a video-game project together, almost ready to go gold and turn a new game loose on the public.
    • 2011, Jessica Mulligan and Bridgette Patrovsky, quoting Damion Schubert, Developing Online Games: An Insider's Guide, page 221:
      I had coded guilds into M59 over the weekend, shortly before we were supposed to go gold.

Adverb[edit]

gold ‎(not comparable)

  1. of or referring to a gold version of something

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: service · various · u · #586: gold · letters · history · master

External links[edit]

  • gold Barthelmy, David (accessed 29 August 2016) Webmineral Mineralogy Database[2]
  • gold mindat.org[3], Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, accessed 29 August 2016

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔl/, [ɡ̊ʌlˀ]

Adjective[edit]

gold

  1. barren, desolate
  2. sterile (unable to reproduce)
  3. dry, (of a cow) not producing milk
    En gold ko.
    A dry cow.

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of gold
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular gold goldere goldest2
Neuter singular goldt goldere goldest2
Plural golde goldere goldest2
Definite attributive1 golde goldere goldeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gold

  1. singular past indicative of gelden

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gold(gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą(gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm(gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃-(yellow; gleam; to shine).

Noun[edit]

gold (plural golds)

  1. gold (metal)

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gulþą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰĺ̥tom, from *ǵʰelh₃-. Cognate with Old Frisian gold, Old Saxon gold, Old High German gold (German Gold), Old Norse goll, gull (Swedish guld), Dutch goud, Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌻𐌸(gulþ). The Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Slavic *zolto (Old Church Slavonic злато(zlato), Russian зо́лото(zóloto)), Proto-Baltic *želt-, *želtas (Lithuanian žel̃tas, Latvian zelts).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold n

  1. gold, riches, treasure
    Abram wæs swiðe welig on golde. Abram was very rich in gold. (Genesis)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English gold.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold ‎(plural golds)

  1. gold

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]