gold

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See also: gòld and Gold

English[edit]

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Chemical element
Au Previous: platinum (Pt)
Next: mercury (Hg)
A gold nugget.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gold, from Old English gold (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold) (Compare Dutch goud, German Gold, Swedish guld), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰel- (yellow; gleam; to shine). compare Latvian zelts, Russian золото (zóloto), Persian زرد (zard, yellow, golden), Sanskrit हिरण्य (hiraṇya). More at yellow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold (countable and uncountable, plural golds)

  1. (uncountable) A heavy yellow elemental metal of great value, with atomic number 79 and symbol Au.
  2. (countable) A coin made of this material, or supposedly so.
  3. (countable) A bright yellow colour, resembling the metal gold.
    gold colour:    
  4. (countable) The bullseye of an archery target.
  5. (countable) A gold medal.
    France has won three golds and five silvers.
  6. (figuratively) Anything or anyone considered to be very valuable.
    • 2010, Paul Hendy, Who Killed Simon Peters?
      Now obviously this meant that I went over my allotted time, but the theatre management didn't mind because I was giving them comedy gold and that's what gets bums on seats.
    • 2012, Victor Pemberton, Leo's Girl
      Marge Quincey didn't deserve a husband like his dad. He was pure gold, and she wasn't worth a light beside him.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

gold (not comparable)

  1. Made of gold.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. [] A silver snaffle on a heavy leather watch guard which connected the pockets of his corduroy waistcoat, together with a huge gold stirrup in his Ascot tie, sufficiently proclaimed his tastes.
  2. Having the colour of gold.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, The China Governess[1]:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
  3. (of commercial services)  Premium, superior.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (having the colour of gold): golden

Verb[edit]

gold (third-person singular simple present golds, present participle golding, simple past and past participle golded)

  1. To pyrolyze or burn food until the color begins to change to a light brown, but not as dark as browning
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

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Etymology 2[edit]

From gold master, a copy of the code certified as being ready for release.

Adjective[edit]

gold (not comparable)

  1. (programming, of software) In a finished state, ready for manufacturing.
    • 2004 November, “Half-Life 2 goes gold”, HWM, page 10: 
      The Company confirmed that Half-Life 2, developed by Valve Software, has gone gold with a planned retail street date of November 16, 2004.
    • 2011, Jordan Gray, Unearthed, page 6:
      He felt bone-tired and twitchy, the way he did in the final stages of putting a video-game project together, almost ready to go gold and turn a new game loose on the public.
    • 2011, Jessica Mulligan and Bridgette Patrovsky quoting Damion Schubert, Developing Online Games: An Insider's Guide, page 221:
      I had coded guilds into M59 over the weekend, shortly before we were supposed to go gold.

Adverb[edit]

gold (not comparable)

  1. of or referring to a gold version of something

Statistics[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔl/, [ɡ̊ʌlˀ]

Adjective[edit]

gold (neuter goldt, definite and plural golde, comparative goldere, superlative goldest)

  1. barren, desolate
  2. sterile (unable to reproduce)
  3. dry, (of a cow) not producing milk
    En gold ko.
    A dry cow.

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gold

  1. singular past indicative of gelden

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gold (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰel- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

Noun[edit]

gold (plural golds)

  1. gold (metal)

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gulþą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰĺ̥tom. Cognate with Old Frisian gold, Old Saxon gold, Old High German gold (German Gold), Old Norse goll, gull (Swedish guld), Dutch goud, Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌻𐌸 (gulþ). The Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Slavic *zolto (Old Church Slavonic злато (zlato), Russian золото (zoloto)), Proto-Baltic *želt-, *želtas (Lithuanian žel̃tas, Latvian zelts).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold n

  1. gold, riches, treasure
    Abram wæs swiðe welig on golde. Abram was very rich in gold. (Genesis)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English gold.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gold (plural golds)

  1. gold

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]