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From Old French fantasie ‎(fantasy), from Latin phantasia ‎(imagination), from Ancient Greek φαντασία ‎(phantasía, apparition), from φαντάζω ‎(phantázō, to show at the eye or the mind), from φαίνω ‎(phaínō, to show in light), from the same root as ϕῶς ‎(ϕôs, light).


  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfæntəsi/, /ˈfæntəzi/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfæntəsi/, [ˈfæntɪ̈si], [ˈfæɾ̃ɪ̈si]


fantasy ‎(plural fantasies)

  1. That which comes from one's imagination.
    • Shakespeare
      Is not this something more than fantasy ?
    • Milton
      A thousand fantasies begin to throng into my memory.
  2. (literature) The literary genre generally dealing with themes of magic and fictive medieval technology.
  3. A fantastical design.
    • Hawthorne
      Embroidered with fantasies and flourishes of gold thread.
  4. (slang) The drug gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


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fantasy ‎(third-person singular simple present fantasies, present participle fantasying, simple past and past participle fantasied)

  1. (literary, psychoanalysis) To fantasize (about).
    • 2013, Mark J. Blechner, Hope and Mortality: Psychodynamic Approaches to AIDS and HIV
      Perhaps I would be able to help him recapture the well-being and emotional closeness he fantasied his brother had experienced with his parents prior to his birth.
  2. (obsolete) To have a fancy for; to be pleased with; to like.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cavendish to this entry?)
    • Robynson (More's Utopia)
      Which he doth most fantasy.

See also[edit]



fantasy f

  1. (literature) fantasy (literary genre)