fantasia

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See also: Fantasia and fantasía

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian fantasia (imagination, fancy, fantasy; musical composition with improvisational characteristics), from Latin phantasia (fancy, fantasy; imagination),[1] borrowed from Ancient Greek φᾰντᾰσῐ́ᾱ (phantasíā, appearance, look; display, presentation; pageantry, pomp; impression, perception; image), from φᾰ́ντᾰσῐς (phántasis) + -ῐ́ᾱ (-íā, suffix forming feminine abstract nouns). Φᾰ́ντᾰσῐς (Phántasis) is derived from φᾰντᾰ́ζω (phantázō, to make visible, show; to become visible, appear; to imagine), from φαίνω (phaínō, to appear; to reveal; to shine), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to shine). The English word is a doublet of fancy, fantasy, phantasia, and phantasy.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fænˈteɪ.zɪ.ə/, /-ˈtɑː-/, /fænˈteɪ.ʒə/, /ˌfæn.təˈziː.ə/
  • (file)
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fænˈteɪ.zi.ə/, /fænˈteɪ.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: fan‧ta‧sia

Noun[edit]

fantasia (plural fantasias)

  1. (music, also figuratively) A form of instrumental composition with a free structure and improvisational characteristics; specifically, one combining a number of well-known musical pieces. [from early 18th c.]
    • 1821, “[...] Fantasia, for the Piano Forte, on Di Tanti Palpiti, by Pio Cianchettini. London. Mitchell. [review]”, in The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, volume III, number X, London: [] Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, [], OCLC 793564889, page 252:
      The Fantasia, by Mr. [Pio] Cianchettini, is upon [Gioachino] Rossini's air "Tu che accendi," so often made the theme of piano forte lessons. [...] Mr. Cianchettini's imagination is very vivid and full, and we know of nothing more florid or requiring lighter and more delicate touching than this Fantasia.
    • 1841, Eleanor Margaret Geary, “[Addenda.] Reviews Consequent upon a Grand Morning Concert Given by Miss Geary and Miss Elizabeth Geary, at Willis’s Great Concert Room, King Street, St. James’s, June 21st, 1841, [...]”, in Musical Education; with Practical Observations on the Art of Piano-forte Playing, London: D’Almaine and Co., [], OCLC 54147888, page 44:
      Miss [Eleanor Margaret] Geary is a brilliant pianiste, who make light of the modern difficulties set down for the instrument: her performance of [Theodor] Döhler's Anna Bolena fantasia was achieved without apparent effort, and won considerable applause; [...] Miss E[lizabeth] Geary is a vocalist, possessing a sweet and flexible voice, [...] this young lady also played a fantasia on the concertina very adroitly.
    • 1853 July, Thomas Buchanan Read, “Pilgrims of the Great St. Bernard”, in George R[ex] Graham, editor, Graham’s Magazine, volume XLIII, number 1, Philadelphia, Pa.: [Watson & Co. []?], OCLC 1084623504, chapter VIII, page 105:
      The little Italian party, before alluded to, had collected around the piano. The white and plump fingers of the gay and black-eyed daughter of the Roman marchioness were tripping lightly up and down the octaves of the instrument, and her little tastefully arranged head was merrily dancing from side to side, keeping time to the half-improvised phantasia, which trickled like a wayward stream from her hands.
    • 1857, Hugh James Rose, “AURENHAMMER,[sic, meaning AUERNHAMMER] (Josepha)”, in A New General Biographical Dictionary, [], volume II, London: T. Fellowes, [], OCLC 960877771, pages 368–369:
      She [Josepha Barbara Auernhammer] published subsequently many works of her own, (in all 63,) which, as well as her play, especially the extempore phantasias, were distinguished by much delicate feeling and a vivid imagination.
    • 1982, Richard Charteris, “Preface”, in John Coprario; Richard Charteris, editor, Twelve Fantasias for Two Bass Viols and Organ, and Eleven Pieces for Three Lyra Viols (Recent Researches in the Music of the Baroque Era; XLI), Madison, Wis.: A-R Editions, →ISBN, ISSN 0584-0828 Invalid ISSN, page vii, column 1:
      Among English composers working during the first half of the seventeenth century, John Coprario distinguished himself as a first-rate craftsman and as the innovator of the three-movement fantasia-suite. [...] These pieces should be viewed in the context of his total output of eight two-part fantasias; ten three-part fantasias; seven four-part fantasias; [...]
    • 1987, “Publisher’s Note”, in Georg Philipp Telemann; Max Seiffert, editor, The 36 Fantasias for Keyboard, New York, N.Y.: Dover Publications, →ISBN:
      Representative as they are of [Georg Philipp] Telemann's introduction to Germany of the lighter and less contrpuntal galant style from France, these fantasias are also obvious precursors of the Classical sonata form.
    • 2001, Annette Richards, “C. P. E. Bach and the Landscapes of Genius”, in The Free Fantasia and the Musical Picturesque (New Perspectives in Music History and Criticism), Cambridge, Cambridgeshire; New York, N.Y.: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 34:
      In 1783 C[arl] P[hilipp] E[manuel] Bach's fourth collection of keyboard music for Kenner und Liebhaber was published by Brietkopf in Leipzig. [...] For the first time in the Kenner und Liebhaber series, this volume contained two free fantasias in addition to sonatas and rondos, a novelty that not only caught the attention of the critics, but seems to have been considered by Bach as a particular selling point for the volume: [...]
  2. (chiefly art, by extension) Any work which is unstructured or comprises other works of different genres or styles.
    • 1872 October 19, “The Cutting of the Nile: From The Pall Mall Gazette”, in Littel’s Living Age, volume XXVII (Fourth Series; volume CXV overall), number 1480, Boston, Mass.: Littel & Gay, OCLC 913200987, page 189, column 2:
      It is, however, a ceremony of immense antiquity, and the chief civil festival of the year among the Arabs, who love nothing more dearly than a "phantasia" of this sort.
    • 1899, I[srael] Zangwill, “The Keeper of Conscience”, in “They that Walk in Darkness”: Ghetto Tragedies, Philadelphia, Pa.: The Jewish Publication Society of America, OCLC 1920973, section VII, page 289:
      When, at the head-centre, the lady demonstrator, armed with a Brobdingnagian whalebone needle, threaded with a bright red cord, executed herringboned fantasias on a canvas frame resembling a violin stand, it all looked easy enough.
    • [1921], H[erbert] G[eorge] Wells, “Preface”, in The War in the Air (Collins’ Thin Paper Pocket Edition; 20), London; Glasgow: Collins Clear-Type Press, OCLC 837923372; quoted in Charles E. Gannon, “Promoters of the Probable, Prophets of the Possible: Technological Innovation and Edwardian Near-future War Fiction”, in Rumors of War and Infernal Machines: Technomilitary Agenda-setting in American and British Speculative Fiction, Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003, →ISBN, page 82:
      Consequently 'War in the Air' means social destruction instead of victory as the end of war. It not only alters the methods of war but the consequences of war. After all that has happened since this fantasia of possibility was written, I do not think that there is much wrong with this thesis.
    • 1966, Brian W[esterdale] Downs, “Ibsen before 1884”, in Modern Norwegian Literature 1860–1918, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: University Press, published 2010, →ISBN, page 44:
      [The Warrior's Barrow (Kjæmpehøjen)] admirably conformed to his employers' National-Romantic aims. This is equally true of the four new plays with which [Henrik] Ibsen honoured his contract: St. John's Night) (Sancthansnatten, 1853), a phantasia having a good deal in common with [William] Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream [...]
    • 1987, Nina Auerbach, “Our Lady of the Lyceum”, in Joan DeJean, Carroll Smith-Rosenberg, Peter Stallybrass, and Gary Tomlinson, editors, Ellen Terry, Player in Her Time (New Cultural Studies), Philadelphia, Pa.: University of Pennsylvania Press, published 1997, →ISBN, page 209:
      These are the years in which she [Ellen Terry] begins to sign her letters in a phantasia of different names.
    • 2003, Ann K. Schwader, “Body of Work”, in Kevin L. O’Brien, editor, Strange Stars & Alien Shadows: The Dark Fiction of Ann K. Schwader, Aurora, Colo.: Lindisfarne Press, →ISBN, page 39:
      Her art is always with her, clothing her from throat to toes in an indelible fantasia of color and form and myth.
    • 2012, Zoe Fishman, chapter 2, in Saving Ruth, New York, N.Y.: William Morrow, →ISBN:
      David and my parents looked up from passing bowls of potato and chicken salad. Great, a mayonnaise fantasia.
    • 2018 December 12, Charles Bramesco, “A Spoonful of Nostalgia Helps the Calculated Mary Poppins Returns Go Down”, in The A.V. Club[1], archived from the original on 24 May 2019:
      [T]he zippy musical numbers in which Mary Poppins (a stiff-lipped Emily Blunt) whisks cherubs Annabel, John, and Georgie (Pixie Davies, Nathanael Saleh, and Joel Dawson, respectively) away into colorful hyperreal fantasias impress.
  3. A traditional festival of the inhabitants of the Maghreb (in northwest Africa) featuring exhibitions of horsemanship.
    • 1868, Mrs. H. Lloyd Evans, “Across the Atlas”, in Last Winter in Algeria, London: Chapman & Hall, [], OCLC 25944134, page 100:
      As for the wonderful feats of horsemanship one hears of or sees among the Arabs, they are due to sharp spurs like razors, and to bits strong enough to break an animal's jaw. [...] Their favourite feat at their fantasias or fêtes of suddenly pulling up their horses short while at hand-gallop, ruins their legs, and there is in consequence scarcely a horse to be seen whose hind-legs are not spavined.
    • 1875 February, “Biskra, in French Algeria, on the Verge of Sahara”, in Frank Leslie’s Pleasant Hours. Devoted to Light and Entertaining Literature, volume XVIII, number I, New York, N.Y.: Frank Leslie [], OCLC 809141532, page 218, column 2:
      These fantasias consist of sham fights, the men riding at full gallop at one another, and firing as they pass; the play might have ended more seriously than was intended, for one Spahi had unknowingly a ball in his rifle, which whizzed close to his enemy's head, but the man never winced, or took any more notice than if it had been blank cartridge, and the fantasia continued as before.
    • 1976, Elizabeth Warnock Fernea, “The Feast of Accession to the Sultan’s Throne”, in A Street in Marrakech: A Personal View of Urban Women in Morocco, Long Grove, Ill.: Waveland Press, published 1988, →ISBN, part II, page 223:
      Everyone was enjoying himself. Political differences seemed to be forgotten. The King was smarter than anyone realized. Bang! Bang! Bang! The fantasias went on and on, the Berber warriors in white, standing up in their silver stirrups on bay, gray, black, and chestnut stallions, firing their silver-chased rifles in perfect unison into the air. [...] The men cheered and the women ululated as each successful fantasia run was completed.
    • 1990 April 30, “Sisley: Relaxed Elegance [advertisement]”, in Edward Kosner, editor, New York, volume 23, number 17, New York, N.Y.: News America Publishing, ISSN 0028-7369, OCLC 1002002954, page 199:
      Mimi was keen to ride a berber horse and Said arranged a Fantasia especially for us – or was it for her? – with the best riders around Marrakech.
    • 2009 October, Laurent Roustan, “The Horse, Present since the Dawn of Time”, in Alphatrad Internationale, transl., Au Royaume du Cheval: Les Haras Nationaux du Maroc [In the Kingdom of the Horse: The National Studs of Morocco], Souyri, Aveyron, France: Editions Au fil du Temps, →ISBN:
      However, in the last few years, the stud farms in Morocco and elsewhere in the world have rediscovered the qualities of the barb [Barbary horse], which, in Berber tradition, remains the king of the "fantasias", a festival that is also becoming fashionable once again.

Alternative forms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin phantasia, from Ancient Greek φαντασία (phantasía).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fantasia f (plural fantasies)

  1. fantasy

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin fantasia, phantasia.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɑntɑsiɑ/, [ˈfɑn̪t̪ɑˌs̠iɑ]
  • Rhymes: -iɑ
  • Syllabification: fan‧ta‧si‧a

Noun[edit]

fantasia

  1. fantasy

Declension[edit]

Inflection of fantasia (Kotus type 12/kulkija, no gradation)
nominative fantasia fantasiat
genitive fantasian fantasioiden
fantasioitten
partitive fantasiaa fantasioita
illative fantasiaan fantasioihin
singular plural
nominative fantasia fantasiat
accusative nom. fantasia fantasiat
gen. fantasian
genitive fantasian fantasioiden
fantasioitten
fantasiainrare
partitive fantasiaa fantasioita
inessive fantasiassa fantasioissa
elative fantasiasta fantasioista
illative fantasiaan fantasioihin
adessive fantasialla fantasioilla
ablative fantasialta fantasioilta
allative fantasialle fantasioille
essive fantasiana fantasioina
translative fantasiaksi fantasioiksi
instructive fantasioin
abessive fantasiatta fantasioitta
comitative fantasioineen
Possessive forms of fantasia (type kulkija)
possessor singular plural
1st person fantasiani fantasiamme
2nd person fantasiasi fantasianne
3rd person fantasiansa

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin phantasia, from Ancient Greek φαντασία (phantasía).

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /fan.taˈzi.a/

Noun[edit]

fantasia f (plural fantasie)

  1. imagination, fantasy, whim, fancy
  2. pattern
  3. (music) fantasia

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: fantasia
  • German: Fantasia

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fantasia f (genitive fantasiae); first declension

  1. Alternative form of phantasia

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fantasia fantasiae
Genitive fantasiae fantasiārum
Dative fantasiae fantasiīs
Accusative fantasiam fantasiās
Ablative fantasiā fantasiīs
Vocative fantasia fantasiae

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin phantasia, from Ancient Greek φαντασία (phantasía).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fantasia f (plural fantasias)

  1. fantasy (imagining)
  2. (literature) fantasy (literary genre)
  3. costume (outfit or a disguise worn as fancy dress)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • fantasia” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fanˈtasja/, [fãn̪ˈt̪asja]

Verb[edit]

fantasia

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of fantasiar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of fantasiar.
  3. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of fantasiar.

Swahili[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English fantasy This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fantasia (n class, plural fantasia)

  1. fantasy (literary genre)