festival

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See also: Festival

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English festival (adjective), from Old French festival, from Late Latin fēstīvālis, from Latin fēstīvus (festive). Displaced native Old English frēols. The noun is shortened from festival day, from Middle English festival dai, festiuall day (feast day, festival).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛstɪvəl/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

festival (comparative more festival, superlative most festival)

  1. Pertaining to a feast or feast day; festive. (Now only as the noun used attributively.)

Noun[edit]

festival (countable and uncountable, plural festivals)

  1. (biblical) A feast or feast day.
    • 2009, “Deuteronomy 16:16”, in Holman Christian Standard Bible:
      All your males are to appear three times a year before the Lord your God in the place He chooses: at the Festival of Unleavened Bread, the Festival of Weeks, and the Festival of Booths. No one is to appear before the Lord empty-handed.
  2. An event or series of special events centred on the celebration or promotion of some theme or aspect of the community, often held at regular intervals.
    The Reading and Leeds festivals take place on the August bank holiday.
    A Welsh eisteddfod is a literary festival.
  3. In mythology, a set of celebrations in the honour of a god.
  4. (Caribbean, Jamaica, uncountable) Fried cornbread.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French festival, from Latin fēstīvālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

festival m (plural festivals)

  1. festival

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English festival.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛstɪval]
  • Hyphenation: fe‧s‧ti‧val

Noun[edit]

festival m inan

  1. festival (an event or community gathering)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • festival in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • festival in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English festival, from Old French festival, from Late Latin fēstīvālis, from Latin fēstīvus (festive).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛs.tiˌvɑl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fes‧ti‧val

Noun[edit]

festival n (plural festivals, diminutive festivalletje n)

  1. A festival (festive event or gathering).

Derived terms[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

festival (genitive festivali, partitive festivali)

  1. festival

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English festival, from Old French festival.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

festival m (plural festivals)

  1. festival

Descendants[edit]

  • Turkish: festival

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English festival.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛ.sti.val/, (traditional) /fe.stiˈval/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɛstival, (traditional) -al
  • Hyphenation: fè‧sti‧val, (traditional) fe‧sti‧vàl

Noun[edit]

festival m (invariable)

  1. festival
  2. worker's festival

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ festival in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin festivalis, via English festival.

Noun[edit]

festival m (definite singular festivalen, indefinite plural festivaler, definite plural festivalene)

  1. a festival

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin festivalis, via English festival.

Noun[edit]

festival m (definite singular festivalen, indefinite plural festivalar, definite plural festivalane)

  1. a festival

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French festival, ultimately from Latin fēstīvālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

festival m (plural festivais)

  1. festival

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French festival.

Noun[edit]

festival n (plural festivaluri)

  1. festival

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

festìvāl m (Cyrillic spelling фестѝва̄л)

  1. festival

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

festival m (genitive singular festivalu, nominative plural festivaly, genitive plural festivalov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. festival

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • festival in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

festival m (plural festivales)

  1. festival

Further reading[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French festival.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

festival (definite accusative festivali, plural festivaller)

  1. festival

Synonyms[edit]