poi

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See also: POI and P.O.I.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A bowl of poi.

Borrowed from Hawaiian poi.

Noun[edit]

poi (uncountable)

  1. (Hawaii) The traditional staple food of Hawaii, made by baking and pounding the kalo (or taro) root, and reducing it to a thin paste, which is allowed to ferment. [from 18th c.]
    • 2012, Julia Flynn Siler, Lost Kingdom, Grove Press, page 104:
      It was a far cry from the traditional Hawaiian feast, which always included the beloved poi, a purplish paste made from pounded taro root [] .
  2. A creamy Samoan dessert of ripe bananas mashed with coconut cream.

Etymology 2[edit]

Fire poi (juggling).

Borrowed from Maori poi.

Noun[edit]

poi (plural poi or pois)

  1. (New Zealand) A small ball made of leaves and fibres, attached to a string; also, a traditional dance performed by Maori women involving the rhythmic swinging of such a ball. [from 19th c.]
    • 2008, Ellen Koskoff, “Haka poi”, in The Concise Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Routledge, →ISBN, page 738:
      Warriors formerly used poi actions to maintain wrist flexibility, but poi have developed as a women's dance. Classic poi dances and songs are reputed to have been those of the people of the Taranaki, Rotorua, and Whanganui tribal areas, but poi are now performed everywhere in Aotearoa.
    • 2013, Catriona Rainsford, The Urban Circus: Travels with Mexico's Malabaristas, Bradt Travel Guides, →ISBN, page 18:
      A couple of days later Trico announced that, if I were to travel with them, it was imperative that I learn some form of malabares, or circus skill. The available options were poi, staff or juggling. ‘Poi’, the form of malabares that Sandra played, are two balls at the end of chains which are spun in patterns around the body. When the balls are replaced by wicks soaked in gasoline and set alight, the poi ‘spin fire’.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Hawaiian[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

poi

  1. Traditional staple food of Hawaiʻi. A porridge-like substance made from cooked and ground taro corm mixed with water.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *pos, from Classical Latin post.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔi

Adverb[edit]

poi

  1. then
  2. later

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

il poi m (invariable)

  1. the future

References[edit]

  1. ^ “poi” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, →ISBN

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

poi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ぽい
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ポイ

Jingpho[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Burmese ပွဲ (pwai:).

Noun[edit]

poi

  1. feast, festival

References[edit]

  • Kurabe, Keita (2016-12-31) , “Phonology of Burmese loanwords in Jinghpaw”, in Kyoto University Linguistic Research[1], volume 35, DOI:10.14989/219015, ISSN 1349-7804, pages 91–128

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin paucus.

Adjective[edit]

poi m or f (invariable)

  1. few; little

Adverb[edit]

poi

  1. little; not much

Pronoun[edit]

poi

  1. few; not many (people, objects etc.)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: peu

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

poi

  1. third-person singular present of poić

Samoan[edit]

Noun[edit]

poi

  1. Samoan poi

Sukurum[edit]

Noun[edit]

poi

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Susanne Holzknecht, The Markham languages of Papua New Guinea (1989), page 71