puis

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

puis

  1. Inessive plural form of puu.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *postius, comparative of Latin post.[1] Compare Portuguese pois, Spanish pues, Italian poi, and Romanian apoi (archaic păi).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

puis

  1. then

Related terms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

puis

  1. and

Verb[edit]

puis

  1. (archaic or literary) first-person singular present indicative of pouvoir
    • 2000, Jean-François Parot, L'énigme des Blancs-Manteaux, JC Lattès 2012, p. 24:
      —Monsieur, dit-il, je vous salue et vous serais obligé de m'indiquer si je puis être reçu par M. de Sartine.
      ‘Sir,’ he said, ‘I bid you good-day, and would be obliged if you could tell me whether I might be received by M. Sartine.’

Usage notes[edit]

  • Now generally used only in the highly formal inverted question form (puis-je "may I"). A common alternative is Est-ce que je peux or more simply in a colloquial context: Je peux or J'peux (pronounced /ʃpø/).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Picoche, Jacqueline; Jean-Claude Rolland (2009) Dictionnaire étymologique du français (in French), Paris: Dictionnaires Le Robert

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

puis f

  1. gust (of wind)

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

puis! puis!

  1. Puss! Puss! (call to cat)

Derived terms[edit]

  • puisín m (pussy-cat; kitten)

Noun[edit]

puis m sg

  1. vocative singular of pus ((protruding) mouth; sulky expression, pout; snout)
  2. genitive singular of pus

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
puis phuis bpuis
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French pois, from Latin *postius, from post.

Preposition[edit]

puis

  1. since; after (with respect to time)
    • circa 1369, Jean Froissart, Chroniques:
      Oncques puis la mort de son frere, il n'y vint
      Never since the death of his brother has he gone there
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 47:
      puis dist a l'enfant
      then he said to the child

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French puis, from Latin puteus.

Noun[edit]

puis m (plural puis)

  1. well (man-made hole from which water is drawn)

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin puteus.

Noun[edit]

puis m (oblique plural puis, nominative singular puis, nominative plural puis)

  1. well (place from which water is drawn)

Descendants[edit]