il

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Translingual[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

il

  1. (Internet) the Internet Top Level Domain code for Israel

Numeral[edit]

il

  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing forty-nine (49).

See also[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic ил
Roman il
Perso-Arabic

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *jɨl (year)[1]

Noun[edit]

il (definite accusative ili, plural illər)

  1. year

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg (2003), “*jɨl”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill

Bunak[edit]

Noun[edit]

il

  1. water

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

il c

  1. (rare) haste, speed

Verb[edit]

il

  1. imperative of ile

Faroese[edit]

Iljar (soles).

Noun[edit]

il f (genitive singular iljar, plural iljar)

  1. the sole of the foot
f8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative il ilin iljar iljarnar
Accusative il ilina iljar iljarnar
Dative il ilini iljum iljunum
Genitive iljar iljarinnar ilja iljanna



French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French il, from Old French il, from Vulgar Latin *illī, which is derived from Classical Latin ille.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

il (third-person singular, plural ils, accusative le, dative lui, emphatic lui)

  1. he (third-person singular masculine subject pronoun for human subject)
  2. it (third-person singular subject pronoun for grammatically masculine objects)
  3. Impersonal subject; it
    Il pleut.It’s raining.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dauzat, Albert; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand (1964), chapter IL, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Friulian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
l'
i
feminine  la
l'
lis

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illum, ultimately from ille.

Article[edit]

il m sg (plural i)

  1. the

See also[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Iljar (soles).

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse il, from Proto-Germanic *iljō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

il f (genitive singular iljar, nominative plural iljar)

  1. the sole of the foot
    Honum sagðist vera illt í ilinni.He said his sole hurt.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

il (plural ili, possessive ilua, possessive plural ilui)

  1. Apocopic form of ilu; he, him

See also[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

il

  1. personal pronoun used with impersonal verbs
    Il ha multe arbores illac.
    There are many trees there.

Usage notes[edit]

Optional.


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish il, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₁-.

Adjective[edit]

il (genitive singular masculine il, genitive singular feminine ile, plural ile, comparative ile)

  1. (literary) many

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

il (genitive singular masculine il, genitive singular feminine ile, plural ile, comparative ile)

  1. Alternative form of oll (great; huge, vast, immense)

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
il n-il hil not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "il" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “il” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “il” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the older form lo, via an intermediate form l, from Latin illum, ultimately from ille. The initial i is a svarabhakti vowel added to the form l in order to make the pronunciation easier.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /il/

Article[edit]

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo/l'
i
gli
feminine  la/l' le

il m sg (plural i)

  1. the

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, →ISBN, pages 123, 124

Anagrams[edit]


Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic اَل (al-).

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

il

  1. the

Usage notes[edit]

  • Before the letters ċ, d, n, r, s, t, x, ż and z the l assimilates, resulting in the following forms:
  • The article (in all forms) connects to the following word with a hyphen.
    il-marathe woman
    il-futurthe future
    ix-xemxthe sun
  • The initial i of the article is dropped before vowels, including before h- and għ-, but not before q- [ʔ].
    l-ibenthe son
    l-għasfurthe bird
    il-qalbthe heart
  • Even before a consonant, the i is dropped when the preceding word ends in a vowel.
    Rajna l-film.We saw the film.
    Rajna x-xemx.We saw the sun.
  • The article forms contractions with certain prepositions.
    mal-marawith the woman
    tax-xemxof the sun

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French il.

Pronoun[edit]

il m

  1. he
  2. it (impersonal, or referring to an unknown person)

Descendants[edit]

  • French: il

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *illī, from Latin ille.

Pronoun[edit]

il

  1. he (third-person masculine singular subject pronoun)
  2. they (third-person masculine plural subject pronoun)
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      S'il vos poent ataindre, ja vos areient tué.
      If they could range you, they would have already killed you.

Descendants[edit]

  • French: il
    • French: il

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *pelh₁-; cognate with Gothic 𐍆𐌹𐌻𐌿 (filu, much), Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, much), Sanskrit पुरु (puru, much).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

il

  1. much, many (usually as the first member of a compound, usually governs a plural noun)
    cosin taidbse ilwith much ostentation
    Is amlid do·rigéni Dia corp duini ó il-ballaib.Thus God has made man's body of many members.
    Is ferr precept oldaas labrad il-béelre.Preaching is better than speaking many languages.
    trissam mrechtrad inna n-il-briatharthrough the variation of the many words

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
il unchanged n-il
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Norse[edit]

Noun[edit]

il f (genitive iljar)

  1. the sole of the foot

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Icelandic: il
  • Faroese: il
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: il

References[edit]

il in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

il c

  1. (archaic) gust; a strong, abrupt rush of wind
  2. (archaic) hurry

Declension[edit]

Declension of il 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative il ilen ilar ilarna
Genitive ils ilens ilars ilarnas

Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

il

  1. province
    Synonym: vilayet

Tzotzil[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

il

  1. (transitive) to see

References[edit]