hil

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Hil, HIL, hil', and гіль

Basque[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

hil ?

  1. month
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

hil

  1. (intransitive) to die
  2. (transitive) to kill
  3. (transitive) to murder
Synonyms[edit]

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *hil, from Proto-Celtic *sīlom.

Noun[edit]

hil m (plural hilyow)

  1. race, ethnicity
    Synonym: agh

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch hil, hille, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (stone, rock), from Proto-Indo-European *kolən-, *koləm- (top, hill, rock). Cognate to English hill, Middle Dutch hulle (hill), Low German hull (hill), Icelandic hóll (hill). Related to holm.

Noun[edit]

hil m (plural hillen, diminutive hilletje n)

  1. (archaic) hill, elevation
    Synonyms: heuvel, hoogte

Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hil

  1. h-prothesized form of il

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hyll, from Proto-Germanic *hulliz (hill).

Noun[edit]

hil (plural hiles)

  1. hill
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: hill
  • Scots: hill, hull

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

hil (plural hiles)

  1. Alternative form of hyl (mound)

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

hil (past participle hiled)

  1. Alternative form of hilen (to cover)

Old Irish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hil

  1. Alternative form of il

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

hil (nominative plural hils)

  1. heel

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *hil, from Proto-Celtic *sīlom (seed), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with Cornish hil (race), Irish síol (seed; race), Latin sēmen (seed), English sow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hil f (plural hilion)

  1. race, ethnicity

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
hil unchanged unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “hil”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies