holm

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See also: Holm, hõlm, and ħolm

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alteration of hollin.

Noun[edit]

holm (plural holms)

  1. (obsolete outside dialects) The holly.
    1590, Edmund Spenser, chapter 1, in The Faerie Queen[1], page 1:
    The sailing pine; the cedar, proud and tall;
    The vine-prop elm; the poplar, never dry;
    The builder oak, sole king of forests all;
    The aspen, good for staves; the cypress, funeral;
    The laurel, meed of mighty conquerors
    And poets sage; the fir, that weepeth still;
    The willow, worn of forlorn paramours;
    The yew, obedient to the binder's will;
    The birch, for shafts; the sallow, for the mill;
    The myrrh, sweet bleeding in the bitter wound;
    The warlike beech; the ash, for nothing ill;
    The fruitful olive, and the plantane round;
    The carver holm; the maple, seldom inward sound.
  2. A common evergreen oak of Europe, Quercus ilex; the holm oak.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse holmi, holmr (islet), from the Proto-Germanic *hulmaz, from Proto-Indo-European root *kelH- (to rise, be elevated, be prominent; hill). Cognate with Old English holm (sea, ocean, wave), Old Saxon holm, Old Danish hulm, Middle Low German holm, German Holm, Middle Dutch holm, Swedish holme,

Noun[edit]

holm (plural holms)

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. An island in a lake, river or estuary; an eyot.
  2. (dialect, chiefly West Yorkshire, Scotland, Orkney) Any small island, but especially one near a larger island or the mainland, sometimes with holly bushes; an islet. Often the word is used in Norse-influenced place-names. See also holme.
  3. Rich flat land near a river, prone to being completely flooded; a river-meadow; bottomland.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse holmr, from Proto-Germanic *hulmaz.

Noun[edit]

holm c (singular definite holmen, plural indefinite holme)

  1. a small island

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hulmaz (hill, rise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holm m (plural holmen, diminutive holmpje n)

  1. a small island

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse holmr. Cognate with Old Saxon holm (German Holm), Old Dutch holm (Dutch holm). The root is Proto-Germanic *hulmaz (hill, rise), equivalent to Latin culmen (peak); compare culminate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holm m (nominative plural holmas)

  1. (poetic) ocean, sea, waters
    Ða wæs heofonweardes gast ofer holm boren.
    The spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

Declension[edit]


Polish[edit]

holm
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xɔlm/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Chemical element
Ho
Previous: dysproz (Dy)
Next: erb (Er)

holm m inan

  1. holmium (chemical element, Ho, atomic number 67)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • holm in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *xъlmъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xòːlm/, /xóːlm/

Noun[edit]

họ̄lm m inan

  1. hill

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. hólm
gen. sing. hólma
singular dual plural
nominative hólm hólma hólmi
accusative hólm hólma hólme
genitive hólma hólmov hólmov
dative hólmu hólmoma hólmom
locative hólmu hólmih hólmih
instrumental hólmom hólmoma hólmi

Further reading[edit]

  • holm”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hulmaz. Cognate with Old Norse holmr, Icelandic hólmur, Old Church Slavonic хлъмъ (xlŭmŭ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

holm n

  1. islet (especially nearby river or mainland)

Declension[edit]

Declension of holm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative holm holmen holmar holmarna
Genitive holms holmens holmars holmarnas

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]