helle

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See also: Helle

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

helle

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of hellen

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

helle

  1. (archaic) Genitive singular form of hel
  2. (archaic) Dative singular form of hel

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhelːeˣ/, [ˈhe̞lːe̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -elːe
  • Syllabification: hel‧le

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *heldeh (compare Karelian helleh), from an earlier *šelteš, borrowed from Proto-Baltic [Term?] (compare Lithuanian šiltas).

Noun[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

helle

  1. hot weather, swelter.
  2. (rare, chiefly figuratively) A hot place or heat.
Declension[edit]
Inflection of helle (Kotus type 48*I/hame, lt-ll gradation)
nominative helle helteet
genitive helteen helteiden
helteitten
partitive hellettä helteitä
illative helteeseen helteisiin
helteihin
singular plural
nominative helle helteet
accusative nom. helle helteet
gen. helteen
genitive helteen helteiden
helteitten
partitive hellettä helteitä
inessive helteessä helteissä
elative helteestä helteistä
illative helteeseen helteisiin
helteihin
adessive helteellä helteillä
ablative helteeltä helteiltä
allative helteelle helteille
essive helteenä helteinä
translative helteeksi helteiksi
instructive heltein
abessive helteettä helteittä
comitative helteineen
Possessive forms of helle (type hame)
possessor singular plural
1st person helteeni helteemme
2nd person helteesi helteenne
3rd person helteensä
Usage notes[edit]

As a technical term, in Finnish weather forecasts the term helle is used of temperatures above +25 °C.

Compounds[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

helle

  1. Allative singular form of he.

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German hellen, from the root of hell (clear, bright). Cognate with German hell, Dutch hel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

helle (strong nominative masculine singular heller, comparative heller, superlative am hellesten or am hellsten)

  1. (regional, Northern Germany, Berlin) clever, smart, bright

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • helle” in Duden online
  • helle” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Karelian[edit]

Noun[edit]

helle

  1. heat

Limburgish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Unknown.

Adjective[edit]

helle (comparative helder, superlative helles, predicative superlative 't hèls)

  1. hard
  2. loud
Usage notes[edit]

Root changed into hel, only used as last word of a phrase.

de hel vrów/de vrów is hel, mer ouch vröntjelik vs. die vrów is helle
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From hel

Noun[edit]

helle f

  1. (obsolete) dative singular of hel

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch hella, from Proto-West Germanic *hallju.

Noun[edit]

helle f

  1. Hell
  2. underworld

Inflection[edit]

Weak feminine
Singular Plural
Nominative helle hellen
Accusative helle hellen
Genitive hellen hellen
Dative helle, hellen hellen

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: hel
  • Limburgish: hel

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English hell, from Proto-West Germanic *hallju, from Proto-Germanic *haljō. The final vowel is generalised from the Old English inflected forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

helle (genitive helles or helle)

  1. Hell (the Christian place of damnation)
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Matheu 10:28, page 4v; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      and nyle ȝe dꝛede hem þat moun ſle þe bodi .· foꝛ þei moun not ſle þe ſoule / but raþere dꝛede ȝe hym þat mai leeſe boþe bodi and ſoule in to helle
      But don't fear those who can kill the body, because they can't kill the soul. Instead, fear the one who can destroy both the body and soul in Hell.
  2. Limbo (waiting place for souls)
  3. (by extension) The underworld in Greco-Roman legend.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

helle (plural helles, genitive helles or helle)

  1. Death, mortality.
  2. A place of suffering or evil.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hella, from hallr (stone).

Noun[edit]

helle f or m (definite singular hella or hellen, indefinite plural heller, definite plural hellene)

  1. flat stone
  2. disc made of iron
Synonyms[edit]
  • (disc made of iron): takke
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hella, from hallr (slope, incline).

Verb[edit]

helle (imperative hell, present tense heller, simple past hellet or helte, past participle hellet or helt, present participle hellende)

  1. to slope, incline
  2. to near an end.
    Dagen heller.
    The day nears its end.
  3. to pour (something)
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hella, from hallr (stone).

Noun[edit]

helle f (definite singular hella, indefinite plural heller, definite plural hellene)

  1. flat stone
  2. disc made of iron

Synonyms[edit]

  • (disc made of iron): takke

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]