hel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Hel, hæl, and he'l

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /heːˀl/, [ˈheˀl]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse heill, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz (whole, sound), cognate with English whole, German heil, Dutch heel, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌻𐍃 (hails).

Adjective[edit]

hel (neuter helt, plural and definite singular attributive hele)

  1. whole, entire, complete, full (undivided, with all elements)
  2. whole, intact, undamaged (not broken)
  3. the hour, top of the hour (at the start of a new hour)
  4. entire (Used to indicate that an amount is considered large.)
    • 2012, Jan Sonnergaard, Trilogien, Gyldendal A/S (→ISBN)
      Man kan være så frygteligt alene i måneder, hele måneder ad gangen, og gøre stort set alt hvad der står i éns magt for at komme i kontakt.
      One can be so terribly alone for months, entire months at a time, and do practically anything in one's power to get in contact.
    • 2012, Ib Melchior, Spionjæger - en dansk kontraspions bedrifter i den amerikanske hær under 2. verdenskrig, Lindhardt og Ringhof (→ISBN)
      Jeg så en mand, der holdt sin Soldbuch frem til samtlige GI'er, der gik forbi i en hel halv time, og ingen tog notits af ham.
      I saw a man who held out his Soldbuch to every single GI who want past him for an entire half hour, and noone took any notice of him.

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

hel

  1. imperative of hele

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɦɛl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hel
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch helle, from Old Dutch hella, from Proto-West Germanic *hallju, from Proto-Germanic *haljō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide, conceal).

Noun[edit]

hel f (plural hellen, diminutive helletje n)

  1. (religion, mythology) Hell, an infernal afterlife.
    Ik hoop dat je zal branden in de hel.
    I hope you will burn in hell.
    Synonyms: poel, jammerpoel
  2. (figuratively) A terrible place or ordeal.
    Hij maakte daarmee haar leven tot een hel.
    With that he made her life into a hell.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Cognate with German hell.

Adjective[edit]

hel (comparative heller, superlative helst)

  1. (archaic) bright
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of hel
uninflected hel
inflected helle
comparative heller
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial hel heller het helst
het helste
indefinite m./f. sing. helle hellere helste
n. sing. hel heller helste
plural helle hellere helste
definite helle hellere helste
partitive hels hellers

Etymology 3[edit]

Cognate with English hall.

Noun[edit]

hel n or f (plural hellen, diminutive helletje n)

  1. hall, frozen spot

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

hel

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hellen
  2. imperative of hellen

References[edit]

  • van Veen, P.A.F.; van der Sijs, Nicoline (1997) Etymologisch woordenboek: de herkomst van onze woorden (in Dutch), Utrecht; Antwerpen: Van Dale Lexicografie, →ISBN

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hel, from Proto-Germanic *haljō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide, conceal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hel f (genitive singular heljar, no plural)

  1. hell (underworld), death

Declension[edit]

The dative helju also occurs, mainly in the phrase heimta úr helju. The word is normally not used with suffixed article, but the genitive definite form, heljarinnar, occurs as an intensifier (meaning something like “hell of a”).

Related terms[edit]


Limburgish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Older Limburgish hèl, from Middle Dutch helle.

Noun[edit]

hel f

  1. hell
  2. (figuratively) a bad place to be
Inflection[edit]
Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative hel ? helke helkes
Genitive hels ? helkes helkes
Locative helles helleser helleske helleskes
Dative¹ helle ? ? ?
Accusative¹ hel ? helke helkes
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.

Etymology 2[edit]

From earlier helle.

Adjective[edit]

hel (comparative helder, superlative hels, predicative superlative 't hèls)

  1. hard, tough, difficult
  2. hard, rough, pointed
  3. hard, heavy
  4. hard, solid
  5. loud
Declension[edit]

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

hel f

  1. solution

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse heill (whole, complete), from Proto-Germanic *hailaz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hel (neuter singular helt, definite singular and plural hele)

  1. whole, unbroken
    Hun har ikke røykt på en hel uke.
    She hasn't smoked for a whole week.
    Jeg vet ikke, hele denne greia virker litt risikabel for meg.
    I don't know, this whole thing seems a little risky to me.
    Jeg tror ikke han forstår hvorfor, Harry, men han hadde det så travelt med å kveste sin egen sjel at han aldri tok seg tid til å forstå den uforliknelige kraft i en sjel som er uplettet og hel. (from page 463 of the Norwegian translation of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry Potter og Halvblodsprinsen)
    I do not think he understands why, Harry, but he was in such a hurry to mutilate his own soul, he never paused to understand the incomparable power of a soul that is untarnished and whole. (from page 478 of the original British version of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince)
  2. pure, all
    Jeg fikk tak i en genser i hel ull, den blir god å ha når vinteren kommer.
    I got myself a pure wool sweater, it'll come in handy when winter arrives.
  3. (used as a noun) it, all of it, the whole/entire thing
    Og det beste ved det hele er at jeg slipper å se deg i to, hele måneder!
    And the best part of it is that I don't have to see you for two whole months!
Synonyms[edit]
whole, unbroken, pure
Derived terms[edit]

See also terms derived from heil

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

hel

  1. imperative of hele

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hel, from Proto-Germanic *haljō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide, conceal).

Noun[edit]

hel (not inflected or declined in any way)

  1. only used in with preposition i, "in, to": i hel, "to death, dead"

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • hel” in The Ordnett Dictionary
  • “hel” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hail, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kóylos. Cognates include Old English hāl, Old Saxon hēl and Old Dutch heil.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈheːl/, [ˈhɛːl]

Adjective[edit]

hēl

  1. whole

Descendants[edit]

  • Saterland Frisian: heel
  • West Frisian: hiel

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *haljō.

Noun[edit]

hel f (genitive heljar, dative helju)

  1. hell

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • hel in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hallju, from Proto-Germanic *haljō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide, conceal).

Noun[edit]

hel f

  1. hell
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle Low German: helle
    • Westphalian:
      Sauerländisch: Helle
      Westmünsterländisch: Helle f, Hell m
    • Plautdietsch: Hal

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hail, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz.

Adjective[edit]

hēl

  1. whole, hale
Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *hail, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz, a noun of similar derivation to the above adjective.

Noun[edit]

hēl n

  1. omen
Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]
  • Middle Low German: hēl

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch geel.

Adjective[edit]

hel

  1. yellow

Polish[edit]

Chemical element
He
Previous: wodór (H)
Next: lit (Li)

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin helium

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hel m inan

  1. helium

Declension[edit]


Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

hel

  1. to like
  2. to find

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse heill, from Proto-Germanic *hailaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hel (comparative helare, superlative helast)

  1. whole; complete
  2. not broken; in order
  3. luck; happiness

Declension[edit]

Inflection of hel
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular hel helare helast
Neuter singular helt helare helast
Plural hela helare helast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 hele helare helaste
All hela helare helaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *selgā, from Proto-Indo-European *selǵ- (let loose, send). Cognate with Old Irish selg.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hel (first-person singular present helaf, not mutable)

  1. (North Wales) to send, to drive, to chase
  2. (North Wales) to collect, to gather
  3. (North Wales) to frequent, to visit often

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “hel”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

hel

  1. a hollow

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN