omen

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See also: Omen

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin omen ‎(foreboding, omen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

omen ‎(plural omens)

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Wikipedia

  1. Something which portends or is perceived to portend a good or evil event or circumstance in the future; an augury or foreboding.
    the ghost's appearance was an ill omen
    a rise in imports might be an omen of recovery
    the egg has, during the span of history, represented mystery, magic, medicine, food and omen
    • 1856, Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter X, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      Day broke. He saw three black hens asleep in a tree. He shuddered, horrified at this omen. Then he promised the Holy Virgin three chasubles for the church, and that he would go barefooted from the cemetery at Bertaux to the chapel of Vassonville.
  2. prophetic significance
    a sign of ill omen

Usage notes[edit]

  • Adjectives often applied to "omen": good, ill, bad, auspicious, evil, favorable, happy, lucky.

Synonyms[edit]

  • portent, sign, signal, token, forewarning, warning, danger sign, foreshadowing, prediction, forecast, prophecy, harbinger, augury, auspice, presage, straw in the wind, (hand)writing on the wall, indication, hint, foretoken; see also Wikisaurus:omen

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

omen ‎(third-person singular simple present omens, present participle omening, simple past and past participle omened)

  1. To be an omen of.
  2. To divine or predict from omens.

Synonyms[edit]

  • prognosticate, betoken, forecast, foretell, portend, foreshadow, bode, augur, prefigure, predict, auspicate, presage

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Latin *osmen, of uncertain ultimate origin. Possibly related to Ancient Greek οἴμαι ‎(oímai, I think, believe, suppose), which is from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew- ‎(to see, perceive)).[1]. Or, related to audio.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ōmen n ‎(genitive ōminis); third declension

  1. an omen

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ōmen ōmina
genitive ōminis ōminum
dative ōminī ōminibus
accusative ōmen ōmina
ablative ōmine ōminibus
vocative ōmen ōmina

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • omen” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • omen” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to wish prosperity to an undertaking: aliquid optimis ominibus prosequi (vid. sect. VI. 11., note Prosequi...)
    • and may heaven avert the omen! heaven preserve us from this: quod di immortales omen avertant! (Phil. 44. 11)
    • to accept as a happy omen: omen accipere (opp. improbare)
    • to interpret something as an omen: accipere, vertere aliquid in omen
    • with favourable omens: faustis ominibus
    • an evil omen; presage of ill: omen infaustum, triste
  1. ^ Watkins, Calvert, ed., The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, 2nd ed., Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000.
  2. ^ The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., Clarendon Press, 1989.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin omen

Noun[edit]

omen n ‎(definite singular omenet, indefinite plural omen or omener or omina, definite plural omena or omenene or ominaene)

  1. an omen

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin omen

Noun[edit]

omen n ‎(definite singular omenet, indefinite plural omen, definite plural omena)

  1. an omen

References[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

omen m

  1. Alternative form of ome