fame

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See also: famé

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French fame ‎(celebrity, renown), from Latin fāma ‎(talk, rumor, report, reputation), from Proto-Indo-European *bheh₂meh₂-, from Proto-Indo-European *bheh₂- ‎(to speak, say, tell). Cognate with Ancient Greek φήμη ‎(phḗmē, talk). Related also to Latin for ‎(speak, say, verb), Old English bōian ‎(to boast), Old English bēn ‎(prayer, request), Old English bannan ‎(to summon, command, proclaim). More at ban.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame ‎(uncountable)

  1. (now rare) What is said or reported; gossip, rumour.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 1, ll. 651-4:
      There went a fame in Heav'n that he ere long / Intended to create, and therein plant / A generation, whom his choice regard / Should favour […].
    • 2012, Faramerz Dabhoiwala, The Origins of Sex, Penguin 2013, p. 23:
      If the accused could produce a specified number of honest neighbours to swear publicly that the suspicion was unfounded, and if no one else came forward to contradict them convincingly, the charge was dropped: otherwise the common fame was held to be true.
  2. One's reputation.
  3. The state of being famous or well-known and spoken of.
    • William Shakespeare
      I find thou art no less than fame hath bruited.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity:
      I was about to say that I had known the Celebrity from the time he wore kilts. But I see I will have to amend that, because he was not a celebrity then, nor, indeed, did he achieve fame until some time after I left New York for the West.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fame ‎(third-person singular simple present fames, present participle faming, simple past and past participle famed)

  1. (transitive) To make (someone or something) famous.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fames.

Noun[edit]

fame f ‎(plural fames)

  1. hunger
    Teníemos fame.
    We're hungry.

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

fame

  1. famously

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fames. Compare Portuguese fome, French faim, Italian fame and Romanian foame.

Noun[edit]

fame f ‎(plural fames)

  1. hunger

Synonyms[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame

  1. hunger

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fames, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰə- ‎(to disappear). Compare Galician fame, French faim, Portuguese fome and Romanian foame.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈfaː.me], /ˈfame/
  • Hyphenation: fà‧me

Noun[edit]

fame f ‎(plural fami)

  1. hunger
    • 2006, Società Biblica di Ginevra, Nuova Riveduta 2006, Psalm 33:19:
      per liberarli dalla morte e conservarli in vita in tempo di fame.
      to deliver them from death and to keep them alive in times of hunger.
    Ho fame.
    I'm hungry (literally: I have hunger).

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f

  1. plural of fama

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame

  1. ablative singular of famēs

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin femina.

Noun[edit]

fame f ‎(oblique plural fames, nominative singular fame, nominative plural fames)

  1. wife, female partner
  2. woman

Usage notes[edit]

  • Unlike in modern French, fam usually refers to a wife, while dame refers to a woman

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *faminem, from Latin famēs ‎(hunger), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰə- ‎(to disappear). Cognate with Old Spanish fambre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f

  1. hunger

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f ‎(plural fames)

  1. Obsolete form of hambre.