fame

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See also: famé

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French fame (celebrity, renown), from Latin fāma (talk, rumor, report, reputation), from Proto-Indo-European *bheh₂meh₂-, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to speak, say, tell). Cognate with Ancient Greek φήμη (phḗmē, talk). Related also to Latin for (speak, say, verb), Old English bōian (to boast), Old English bēn (prayer, request), Old English bannan (to summon, command, proclaim). More at ban.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame (usually uncountable, plural fames)

  1. (now rare) What is said or reported; gossip, rumour.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 1, ll. 651-4:
      There went a fame in Heav'n that he ere long / Intended to create, and therein plant / A generation, whom his choice regard / Should favour […].
    • 2012, Faramerz Dabhoiwala, The Origins of Sex, Penguin 2013, page 23:
      If the accused could produce a specified number of honest neighbours to swear publicly that the suspicion was unfounded, and if no one else came forward to contradict them convincingly, the charge was dropped: otherwise the common fame was held to be true.
  2. One's reputation.
  3. The state of being famous or well-known and spoken of.
    • William Shakespeare
      I find thou art no less than fame hath bruited.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      I was about to say that I had known the Celebrity from the time he wore kilts. But I see I will have to amend that, because he was not a celebrity then, nor, indeed, did he achieve fame until some time after I left New York for the West.

Derived terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

fame (third-person singular simple present fames, present participle faming, simple past and past participle famed)

  1. (transitive) To make (someone or something) famous.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fames.

Noun[edit]

fame f (plural fames)

  1. hunger
    Teníemos fame.
    We're hungry.

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

fame

  1. famously

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin famēs, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰH- (to disappear). Cognate with Portuguese fome, French faim, Italian fame and Romanian foame.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f (plural fames)

  1. hunger
    • 1390, Pensado Tomé, José Luís (ed). Os Miragres de Santiago. Versión gallega del Códice latino del siglo XII atribuido al papa Calisto I. Madrid: C.S.I.C., page 136:
      onde eu moytas chagas et deostos et pelejas et escarnos et caenturas et cãsaço et fame et frio et moytos outros traballos padeçin
      here, where I have suffered many sores and insults and fights and derision and fever and tiredness and hunger and cold and so many other labours
  2. famine
    • 1419, Pérez Rodríguez, F. (ed.), "San Jorge de Codeseda: un monasterio femenino bajomedieval", in Studia Monastica (33), page 84:
      eno tempo da abadesa Donna Moor Peres, que foy ante do anno da grande fame
      in times of the abbess Lady Mor Pérez, which was the year before the great famine

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • fame” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • fame” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • fame” in Santamarina, Antón (coord.): Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega. <http://ilg.usc.es/TILG/>
  • fame” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega. <http://ilg.usc.es/Tesouro>



Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame

  1. hunger

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fames, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰə- (to disappear). Compare Galician fame, French faim, Portuguese fome and Romanian foame.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈfaː.me], /ˈfame/
  • Hyphenation: fà‧me

Noun[edit]

fame f (plural fami)

  1. hunger
    • 2006, Società Biblica di Ginevra, Nuova Riveduta 2006, Psalm 33:19:
      per liberarli dalla morte e conservarli in vita in tempo di fame.
      to deliver them from death and to keep them alive in times of hunger.
    Ho fame.
    I'm hungry (literally: I have hunger).

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f

  1. plural of fama

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame

  1. ablative singular of famēs

References[edit]

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “fame”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • fame in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin femina.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f (oblique plural fames, nominative singular fame, nominative plural fames)

  1. wife, female partner
  2. woman

Usage notes[edit]

  • Unlike in modern French, fame usually refers to a wife, while dame usually refers to a woman

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *faminem, from Latin famēs (hunger), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰə- (to disappear). Cognate with Old Spanish fambre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f

  1. hunger

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

fame f (plural fames)

  1. Obsolete form of hambre.