fama

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See also: Fama

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Eastern) IPA(key): /ˈfamə/
  • (Western) IPA(key): /ˈfama/

Noun[edit]

fama f ‎(plural fames)

  1. fame

Chickasaw[edit]

Verb[edit]

fama

  1. to be whipped

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfama/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ma

Adjective[edit]

fama ‎(accusative singular faman, plural famaj, accusative plural famajn)

  1. famous

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fāma.

Noun[edit]

fama f ‎(plural fame)

  1. fame, renown
  2. reputation, name
  3. report, rumor

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE root
*bʰeh₂-

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂-mā-, from *bʰeh₂- ‎(to speak). Cognate to Ancient Greek φήμη ‎(phḗmē, talk).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fāma f ‎(genitive fāmae); first declension

  1. fame
  2. rumour
  3. reputation
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Heroides 17.17, (translation Benham's Book of Quotations 1948)
      Fama tamen clara est; et adhuc sine crimine vixi.
      My good name is nevertheless unstained; and so far I have lived without blame.
    • 61 CEc. 112 CE, Pliny the Younger, Epistulae 3.20.9
      Multi famam, conscientiam pauci verentur.
      Many fear their reputation, few their conscience.
    Dimicanti de fama deesse.
    To abandon one whose reputation is attacked.
  4. vocative singular of fama

fāmā

  1. ablative singular of fāmā

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fāma fāmae
genitive fāmae fāmārum
dative fāmae fāmīs
accusative fāmam fāmās
ablative fāmā fāmīs
vocative fāma fāmae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • fama” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • fama” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be able to endure hunger and thirst: famis et sitis patientem esse
    • report says; people say: rumor, fama, sermo est or manat
    • a rumour is prevalent: rumor, fama viget
    • a report is spreading imperceptibly: fama serpit (per urbem)
    • to spread a rumour: famam dissipare
    • to know from hearsay: auditione et fama accepisse aliquid
    • to gain distinction: gloriam, famam sibi comparare
    • to detract from a person's reputation, wilfully underestimate a person: de gloria, fama alicuius detrahere
    • to detract from a person's reputation, wilfully underestimate a person: alicuius famam, laudem imminuere
    • to render obscure, eclipse a person: obscurare alicuius gloriam, laudem, famam (not obscurare aliquem)
    • to have regard for one's good name: famae servire, consulere
    • to live up to one's reputation: famam ante collectam tueri, conservare
    • to gain the reputation of cruelty: famam crudelitatis subire (Catil. 4. 6. 12)
    • to leave a great reputation behind one: magnam sui famam relinquere

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese fama, from Latin fāma, from Proto-Indo-European *bheh₂-mā-, from *bheh₂- ‎(to speak).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɐ.mɐ/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ma
  • Rhymes: -ama

Noun[edit]

fama f (plural famas)

  1. reputation
    Esse homem tem má fama.
    That man has a bad reputation.
  2. fame
    Ele entrou para o hall da fama.
    He entered the hall of fame.

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fāma.

Noun[edit]

fama f ‎(plural famas)

  1. reputation
  2. fame

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]