dong

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Vietnamese đồng, from Middle Chinese (duwng, copper) (compare Mandarin (tóng)), from Old Chinese (*lˁoŋ).

Noun[edit]

dong (plural dongs or dong)

  1. The currency of Vietnam, 100 xus. Symbol:
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin unknown. Perhaps from The Dong with a Luminous Nose, an 1894 poem by Edward Lear about a mythical creature. Attested since the 1930s.

Noun[edit]

dong (plural dongs)

  1. (slang) A penis.
    • 1969, Philip Roth, Portnoy’s Complaint, page 18:
      Nevertheless, I was wholly incapable of keeping my paws from my dong once it started the climb up my belly.
    • 1983, "Penis Song" (from Monty Python's The Meaning of Life)
      Isn't it awfully nice to have a penis?
      Isn't it frightfully good to have a dong?
  2. (slang, by extension) A dildo, specifically a synthetic anatomical replica of the penis.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Onomatopoeic

Noun[edit]

dong (plural dongs)

  1. Onomatopoeia for the ringing sound made by a bell with a low pitch.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dong (third-person singular simple present dongs, present participle donging, simple past and past participle donged)

  1. Of a bell: to make a low-pitched ringing sound.

Etymology 4[edit]

Korean (dong, neighborhood)

Noun[edit]

dong (plural dongs)

  1. A submunicipal administrative unit of a city in North or South Korea.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɔŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔŋ

Etymology 1[edit]

Cognate to English dung.

Noun[edit]

dong m (uncountable)

  1. (dated, dialectal, Northern) dung, manure
    Synonym: mest

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

dong c (plural dongs)

  1. dong, the currency of Vietnam

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

dong

  1. singular past indicative of dingen

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From an onomatopoeia + -g (frequentative verb-forming suffix).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dong

  1. (intransitive, of an insect) to buzz, bumble, drone
  2. (intransitive, of a large hollow object) to boom, rumble, thunder (to make a dull, low-pitched, reverberating sound when hit)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

dong

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dōng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of dǒng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of dòng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

dong

  1. Alternative form of donge

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

dong m (definite singular dongen, indefinite plural donger, definite plural dongene)

  1. (slang) condom

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

dong m (plural dongs)

  1. dong (currency of Vietnam)

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dong

  1. drive, escort

Noun[edit]

(classifier cây) dong

  1. Phrynium placentarium

Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dyngj.

Noun[edit]

dong m (definite dongen)

  1. droppings, especially in a pen, especially sheep droppings mixed with straw residue, bedding and hay motes, which the sheep lie on in the sheep barn