ask

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See also: Ask and aşk

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English asken, from Old English āxian, āscian ‎(to ask, inquire, seek for, demand, call, summon, examine, observe), from Proto-Germanic *aiskōną ‎(to ask, ask for), from Proto-Indo-European *ayǝs- ‎(to look for). Cognate with Scots ask ‎(to question, ask, demand, require), Saterland Frisian aaskje ‎(to demand, dictate, mandate, exact), West Frisian easkje ‎(to require, postulate, demand), Dutch eisen ‎(to demand, require), German heischen ‎(to demand), Danish æske ‎(to provoke), Swedish äska ‎(to demand), Russian искать ‎(iskatʹ, to seek, look for).

Verb[edit]

ask (third-person singular simple present asks, present participle asking, simple past and past participle asked)

  1. To request (information, or an answer to a question).
    I asked her age.
  2. To put forward (a question) to be answered.
    to ask a question
  3. To interrogate or enquire of (a person).
    I'm going to ask this lady for directions.
    • Bible, John ix. 21
      He is of age; ask him: he shall speak for himself.
  4. To request or petition; usually with for.
    to ask for a second helping at dinner
    to ask for help with homework
    • Bible, Matthew vii. 7
      Ask, and it shall be given you.
  5. To require, demand, claim, or expect, whether by way of remuneration or return, or as a matter of necessity.
    What price are you asking for the house?
    • Addison
      An exigence of state asks a much longer time to conduct a design to maturity.
  6. To invite.
    Don't ask them to the wedding.
  7. To publish in church for marriage; said of both the banns and the persons.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)
  8. (figuratively) To take (a person's situation) as an example.
    • 1990 April 26, Paul Wiseman, “Dark days”, USA Today:
      Even when the damage isn't that clear cut, the intangible burdens of a bad image can add up. Just ask Dow Chemical.
Usage notes[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

ask (plural asks)

  1. An act or instance of asking.
    • 2005, Laura Fredricks, The ask:
      To ask for a gift is a privilege, a wonderful expression of commitment to and ownership of the organization. Getting a yes to an ask can be a rush, but asking for the gift can and should be just as rewarding.
  2. Something asked or asked for; a request.
    • 2008, Doug Fields, Duffy Robbins, Speaking to Teenagers:
      Communication researchers call this the foot-in-the-door syndrome. Essentially it's based on the observation that people who respond positively to a small “ask” are more likely to respond to a bigger “ask” later on.
  3. An asking price.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English aske, arske, from Old English āþexe ‎(lizard, newt), from Proto-Germanic *agiþahsijǭ ‎(lizard), from Proto-Germanic *agi- ‎(snake) (from Proto-Indo-European *ogʷh- ‎(snake, lizard)) + Proto-Germanic *þahsuz ‎(badger) (from Proto-Indo-European *teḱs- ‎(to hew, trim)). Cognate with Scots ask, awsk, esk ‎(an eft or newt), Dutch hagedis ‎(lizard), German Echse, Eidechse ‎(lizard).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ask (plural asks)

  1. (UK dialectal and Scotland) An eft; newt.
    • 1876, S. Smiles, Scottish Naturalist:
      He looked at the beast. It was not an eel. It was very like an ask.
  2. (UK dialectal) A lizard.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse askr, from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃és-no-, *h₃és-i- ‎(ash).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ask c (singular definite asken, plural indefinite aske)

  1. common ash (tree, Fraxinus excelsior)

Inflection[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse askr, from Proto-Germanic *askaz, *askiz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ōs- ‎(ash).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ask f (genitive singular askar, plural askir)

  1. ash tree
  2. ash wood

Declension[edit]

f2 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ask askin askir askirnar
Accusative ask askina askir askirnar
Dative ask askini askum askunum
Genitive askar askarinnar aska askanna

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse askr.

Noun[edit]

ask m (definite singular asken, indefinite plural asker, definite plural askene)

  1. the European ash (ash tree) Fraxinus excelsior

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse askr.

Noun[edit]

ask m (definite singular asken, indefinite plural askar, definite plural askane)

  1. the European ash (ash tree) Fraxinus excelsior

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *askaz, *askiz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ōs- ‎(ash). Cognate with Old English æsc, Dutch es, Old High German asc (whence German Esche), Old Norse askr (whence Swedish ask). The Indo-European root, in various forms, is also the source of Ancient Greek οξύα ‎(oksúa, beech, spear-shaft), Latin ornus, Russian я́сень ‎(jásenʹ, ash), Lithuanian úosis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ask m

  1. ash tree
  2. spear

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse askr, from Proto-Germanic *askaz, *askiz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ōs- ‎(ash).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ask c

  1. the European ash (tree) Fraxinus excelsior
  2. a small box

Declension[edit]