box

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

A wooden box.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English box, from Old English box ‎(box-tree; box, case), from Proto-Germanic *buhsuz (compare Dutch bus ‎(container, box; bushing of a wheel), German Büchse, Swedish hjulbössa ‎(wheel-box)), from Late Latin buxis ‎(box), from Ancient Greek πυξίς ‎(puxís, boxwood box), from πύξος ‎(púxos, box tree).

Noun[edit]

box ‎(plural boxes) (see also Usage notes below)

  1. A cuboid space; a container, usually with a hinged lid.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The huge square box, parquet-floored and high-ceilinged, had been arranged to display a suite of bedroom furniture designed and made in the halcyon days of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, […].
  2. As much as fills a such a container.
    a box of books
  3. A compartment of a storage furniture, or of a part of such a furniture, such as of a drawer, shelving, etc.
  4. A compartment to sit in at a theater, courtroom, or auditorium.
  5. A small rectangular shelter like a booth.
    a sentry box
  6. A rectangle.
    Place a tick or a cross in the box.
    This text would stand out better if we put it in a box of colour.
  7. An input field on an interactive electronic display.
  8. A numbered receptacle at a newspaper office for anonymous replies to advertisements.
  9. A trap or predicament.
    I'm really in a box now.
  10. The driver's seat on a coach.
  11. (cricket)  A hard protector for the genitals worn by a batsman or close fielder inside the underpants.
  12. (engineering)  A cylindrical casing around for example a bearing or gland.
  13. (soccer)  The penalty area.
    • 2010 December 29, Chris Whyatt, “Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton”, in BBC[2]:
      Poised link-up play between Essien and Lampard set the Ghanaian midfielder free soon after but his left-footed shot from outside the box was too weak.
  14. (computing, slang)  A computer, or the case in which it is housed. usage syn. transl.
    a UNIX box
    • 1996, Siu Ha Vivian Chu, DEC vt320 → linux boxen in comp.os.linux.networking
      i can't seem to find any how-to regarding connecting a terminal to a linux boxen via parallel port...
    • 2002, Gregory Seidman, serving debian to redhat boxen in muc.lists.debian.user
      Furthermore, it is necessary that all four Linux boxen have the same development environment...
  15. (slang, with the)  Television.
  16. (slang, offensive)  The vagina.
  17. (euphemistic)  Coffin.
  18. (juggling)  A pattern usually performed with three balls where the movements of the balls make a boxlike shape.
  19. Horse box.
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty Chapter 22[3]
      He was a fine-looking middle-aged man, and his voice said at once that he expected to be obeyed. He was very friendly and polite to John, and after giving us a slight look, he called a groom to take us to our boxes, and invited John to take some refreshment.
  20. (baseball) The rectangle in which the batter stands.
  21. A Mediterranean food fish; the bogue.
  22. (dated) A small country house.
    a shooting box
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilson to this entry?)
    • Cowper
      tight boxes neatly sashed
  23. (informal) box lacrosse
  24. (genetics) One of two specific regions in a promoter.
Usage notes[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

box ‎(third-person singular simple present boxes, present participle boxing, simple past and past participle boxed)

  1. (transitive) To place inside a box; to pack in boxes.
  2. (transitive, usually with 'in') To hem in.
  3. (transitive, object-oriented programming) To place a value of a primitive type into a corresponding object.
  4. (transitive) To mix two containers of paint of similar color to ensure that the color is identical.
  5. (transitive) To furnish (e.g. a wheel) with boxes.
  6. (architecture) To enclose with boarding, lathing, etc., so as to bring to a required form.
  7. (transitive) To make an incision or hole in (a tree) for the purpose of procuring the sap.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English [Term?], from Old English [Term?], from Latin buxus, from Ancient Greek πύξος ‎(púxos, box tree).

Noun[edit]

box ‎(plural boxes)

  1. Any of various evergreen shrubs or trees of the genus Buxus.
    • 2014 November 19, Ambra Edwards, “Topiary: We're all going bonkers about box [print version: Bonkers about box, 22 November 2014, p. G3]”, in The Daily Telegraph (Gardening)[4]:
      "Box makes a statement without having to do much: just trim twice a year and keep it weeded. It's a bit of a lazy gardener's plant." This, no doubt, is what makes box so popular with show home developers and city dwellers – there is scarce a balcony or front door anywhere that cannot be improved by a box ball in a pot.
  2. Boxwood: the wood from a box tree.
    • 1884, John R. Jackson, “Boxwood and its Substitutes”, reprinted in Journal of the Society of Arts, 1885 April 10, page 567:
      Nevertheless, the application of woods other than box for purposes for which that wood is now used would tend to lessen the demand for box, and thus might have an effect in lowering its price.
  3. (Australia) Species of Lophostemon.
  4. (slang) A musical instrument, especially/usually one made from boxwood.
    • 1937, Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Harper Perennial (2000), page 100:
      “Evenin’, folks. Thought y’all might lak uh lil music this evenin’ so Ah brought long mah box.”
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
  • (evergreen shrub or tree): boxwood
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English boxen ‎(to box, beat) and box ‎(a blow, a hit), of unknown origin but apparently akin to Middle Dutch boke ‎(a blow, a hit), Middle High German buc ‎(a blow), Danish bask ‎(a blow). See also Ancient Greek πύξ ‎(púx), πυγμή ‎(pugmḗ) (fist, pugilism)

Noun[edit]

box ‎(plural boxes)

  1. A blow with the fist.
    • Washington Irving
      And then he whispered something to the girl which made her laugh, and give him a good-humored box on the ear.
    • 1837–1839, Charles Dickens, chapter 7, in Oliver Twist[5], HTML edition:
      'Now, you are a nice young fellow, ain't you?' said Sowerberry; giving Oliver a shake, and a box on the ear.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

box ‎(third-person singular simple present boxes, present participle boxing, simple past and past participle boxed)

  1. (transitive) To strike with fists; to punch.
    box someone's ears
    Leave this place before I box you!
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, chapter 4, in Jane Eyre[6], HTML edition:
      Mrs. Reed soon rallied her spirits: she shook me most soundly, she boxed both my ears, and then left me without a word.
  2. (transitive) To fight against (a person) in a boxing match.
  3. (intransitive) To participate in boxing; to be a boxer.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

External links[edit]

  • box at OneLook Dictionary Search

Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia cs

box

Noun[edit]

box m

  1. boxing (the sport of boxing)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • box in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • box in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English box.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m ‎(plural box or boxes)

  1. stall (for a horse), loose box
  2. compartment, cubicle
  3. garage, lock-up (for a car)
Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

Noun[edit]

box f ‎(plural box)

  1. Electronic equipment used for internet access (component of the digital subscriber line technology)

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box n ‎(genitive singular box, nominative plural box)

  1. box (container)
  2. (sports) boxing

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English box.

Noun[edit]

box m ‎(invariable)

  1. horsebox
  2. garage, lock-up (for a car)
  3. (motor racing) pit
  4. playpen

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βώξ ‎(bṓx).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bōx m ‎(genitive bōcis); third declension

  1. A kind of marine fish

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative bōx bōcēs
genitive bōcis bōcum
dative bōcī bōcibus
accusative bōcem bōcēs
ablative bōce bōcibus
vocative bōx bōcēs

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English box.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m (plural boxes)

  1. the curtain or glass panes which separate the shower from the rest of the bathroom
    • 2003, Eileen G. de Paiva e Mello, Questão de Tempo, Thesaurus Editora, page 150:
      A mais velha procurava arrancar a cortina do box, pendurando-se nela!
      The oldest one wanted to pull off the stall curtain by hanging to it!

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French boxe.

Noun[edit]

box n ‎(plural boxuri)

  1. (sports) boxing (the sport of)
  2. A kind of sword.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French box.

Noun[edit]

box

  1. bovine leather

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

box

  1. A breed of bulldog.

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m ‎(plural boxes)

  1. boxing
  2. (motor racing) pit
  3. (sports) box