box

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Box and b'ox

Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

A Japanese wooden bento box (sense 1.1) used to hold food
A cat sitting in a cardboard delivery box (sense 1.1)
A box (sense 1.5) or loge in the Semperoper in Dresden, Germany
A soldier of Hans Majestet Kongens Garde (His Majesty the King’s Guard) in front of a sentry box (sense 1.7) at the Royal Palace in Oslo, Norway
A box (sense 1.16) used to register on target and off target hits in electric fencing
An animation of a box (sense 2.6) in juggling

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English box (jar (usually cylindrical); type of container; strongbox for valuables or its contents; cupping glass for bloodletting; bone socket), from Old English box (box-tree; box, case),[1] from Proto-Germanic *buhsuz (box tree; thing made from boxwood; box), either from Latin buxus (box tree; thing made from boxwood), buxum (box tree; boxwood) (possibly from πύξος (púxos, box tree; boxwood)); or from Late Latin buxis (box), Latin pyxis (small box for medicines or toiletries) (from Ancient Greek πυξίς (puxís, box or tablet made of boxwood; box; cylinder), from πύξος (púxos) + -ῐς (-is, suffix forming feminine nouns)).[2]

If the latter derivation is correct, the word is cognate with Middle Dutch bosse, busse (jar; tin; round box) (modern Dutch bos (wood, forest), bus (container, box; bushing of a wheel)), Old High German buhsa (Middle High German buhse, bühse, modern German Büchse (box; can)), Swedish hjulbössa (wheel-box).[2]

The humorous plural form boxen is from box + -en, by analogy with oxen.

Noun[edit]

box (plural boxes or boxen) (computing, humorous: see the usage notes below)

  1. Senses relating to a three-dimensional object or space.
    1. A cuboid space; a cuboid container, often with a hinged lid.
    2. A cuboid container and its contents; as much as fills such a container.
      a box of books
      • 1719 April 25, [Daniel Defoe], The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, [], London: Printed by W[illiam] Taylor [], OCLC 15864594; 3rd edition, London: Printed by W[illiam] Taylor [], 1719, OCLC 838630407, page 325:
        Firſt he had brought me a Caſe of bottles full of excellent Cordial Waters, ſix large Bottles of Madera Wine; the Bottles held two Qarts a-piece; two Pound of excellent good Tobacco, twelve good Pieces of the Ship’s Beef, and ſix Pieces of Pork, with a Bag of Peaſe, and about a hundred Weight of Biſket. He brought me also a Box of Sugar, a Box of Flour, a Bag full of Lemons, and two Bottles of Lime-juice, and abundance of other Things: []
    3. A compartment (as a drawer) of an item of furniture used for storage, such as a cupboard, a shelf, etc.
    4. A compartment or receptacle for receiving items.
      1. A numbered receptacle at a newspaper office for anonymous replies to advertisements.
    5. A compartment to sit inside in an auditorium, courtroom, theatre, or other building.
    6. The driver's seat on a horse-drawn coach.
    7. A small rectangular shelter; a booth.
    8. Short for horsebox (container for transporting horses).
      • 1877, Anna Sewell, “Earlshall”, in Black Beauty: [], London: Jarrold and Sons, [], OCLC 228733457, part II, page 101:
        He was a fine-looking middle-aged man, and his voice said at once that he expected to be obeyed. He was very friendly and polite to John, and after giving us a slight look, he called a groom to take us to our boxes, and invited John to take some refreshment.
    9. (figuratively) A predicament or trap.
      I’m really in a box now.
    10. (euphemistic) A coffin.
    11. (slang) Preceded by the: television.
    12. (slang, vulgar) The vagina.
    13. (computing, slang) A computer, or the case in which it is housed.
      a UNIX box
      • 1996 January 15, Siu Ha Vivian Chu, “DEC vt320 → linux boxen”, in comp.os.linux.networking, Usenet[1], message-ID <4dceos$gg7@morgoth.sfu.ca>:
        i can't seem to find any how-to regarding connecting a terminal to a linux boxen via parallel port …
      • 2002 September 8, Gregory Seidman, “serving debian to redhat boxen”, in muc.lists.debian.user, Usenet[2], message-ID <20020908205128.GA19944@cs.brown.edu>:
        Furthermore, it is necessary that all four Linux boxen have the same development environment []
    14. (cricket) A hard protector for the genitals worn inside the underpants by a batsman or close fielder.
    15. (engineering) A cylindrical casing around the axle of a wheel, a bearing, a gland, etc.
    16. (fencing) A device used in electric fencing to detect whether a weapon has struck an opponent, which connects to a fencer's weapon by a spool and body wire. It uses lights and sound to notify a hit, with different coloured lights for on target and off target hits.
    17. (dated) A small country house.
      a shooting box
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilson to this entry?)
      • Cowper
        tight boxes neatly sashed
  2. Senses relating to a two-dimensional object or space
    1. A rectangle: an oblong or a square.
      Place a tick in the box.
      This text would stand out better if we put it in a coloured box.
    2. (baseball) The rectangle in which the batter stands.
    3. (computing) An input field on an interactive electronic display; a text box.
    4. (genetics) One of two specific regions in a promoter.
    5. (juggling) A pattern usually performed with three balls where the movements of the balls make a boxlike shape.
    6. (lacrosse, informal) Short for box lacrosse (indoor form of lacrosse).
    7. (soccer) The penalty area.
Usage notes[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
See also[edit]
  • tofu (empty box displayed by some computer systems in place of a character not supported by available fonts)

Verb[edit]

box (third-person singular simple present boxes, present participle boxing, simple past and past participle boxed)

  1. (transitive) To place inside a box; to pack in one or more boxes.
  2. (transitive) Usually followed by in: to surround and enclose in a way that restricts movement; to corner, to hem in.
  3. (transitive) To mix two containers of paint of similar colour to ensure that the color is identical.
  4. (transitive, agriculture) To make an incision or hole in (a tree) for the purpose of procuring the sap.
  5. (transitive, architecture) To enclose with boarding, lathing, etc., so as to conceal (for example, pipes) or to bring to a required form.
  6. (transitive, engineering) To furnish (for example, the axle of a wheel) with a box.
  7. (transitive, graphic design, printing) To enclose (images, text, etc.) in a box.
  8. (transitive, object-oriented programming) To place a value of a primitive type into a corresponding object.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English box (box tree; boxwood), from Old English box (box tree),[3] from Proto-Germanic *buhsuz (box tree; thing made from boxwood), from Latin buxus (box tree; thing made from boxwood), buxum (box tree; boxwood), possibly from πύξος (púxos, box tree; boxwood).[4]

Noun[edit]

box (plural boxes)

  1. Any of various evergreen shrubs or trees of the genus Buxus, especially the common box, European box, or boxwood (Buxus sempervirens) which is often used for making hedges and topiary.
    • 1847 October 16, Currer Bell [pseudonym; Charlotte Brontë], chapter V, in Jane Eyre. An Autobiography. [...] In Three Volumes, volume II, London: Smith, Elder, and Co., [], OCLC 3163777, pages 130–131:
      He strayed down a walk edged with box; with apple trees, pear trees, and cherry trees on one side, and a border on the other, full of all sorts of old-fashioned flowers, stocks, sweet-williams, primroses, pansies, mingled with southernwood, sweet-briar, and various fragrant herbs.
    • 2014 November 19, Ambra Edwards, “Topiary: We're all going bonkers about box [print version: Bonkers about box, 22 November 2014, page G3]”, in The Daily Telegraph (Gardening)[4]:
      "Box makes a statement without having to do much: just trim twice a year and keep it weeded. It's a bit of a lazy gardener's plant." This, no doubt, is what makes box so popular with show home developers and city dwellers – there is scarce a balcony or front door anywhere that cannot be improved by a box ball in a pot.
  2. The wood from a box tree: boxwood.
    • 1885 April 10, John R. Jackson, “Boxwood and Its Substitutes”, in Journal of the Society of Arts, volume XXXIII, number 1,690, London: Published for the Society by George Bell and Sons, [], page 567, column 1:
      Nevertheless, the application of woods other than box for purposes for which that wood is now used would tend to lessen the demand for box, and thus might have an effect in lowering its price.
  3. (music, slang) A musical instrument, especially one made from boxwood.
  4. (Australia) An evergreen tree of the genus Lophostemon (for example, the box scrub, Brisbane box, brush box, pink box, or Queensland box, Lophostemon confertus).
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

A woman practising boxing in Brazil

From Middle English box (a blow; a stroke with a weapon);[5] further origin uncertain. The following etymologies have been suggested:[6]

The verb is from Middle English boxen (to beat or whip (an animal)), which is derived from the noun.[7]

Noun[edit]

box (plural boxes)

  1. A blow with the fist.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

box (third-person singular simple present boxes, present participle boxing, simple past and past participle boxed)

  1. (transitive) To strike with the fists; to punch.
    box someone’s ears
    Leave this place before I box you!
  2. (transitive, boxing) To fight against (a person) in a boxing match.
  3. (intransitive, boxing) To participate in boxing; to be a boxer.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

The box or bogue (Boops boops), a variety of sea bream

From Latin bōx, from Ancient Greek βῶξ (bôx, box (marine fish)), from βοῦς (boûs, ox) + ὤψ (ṓps, eye, view), a reference to the large size of the fish's eyes relative to its body.[8]

Noun[edit]

box (plural boxes)

  1. (dated) A Mediterranean food fish of the genus Boops, which is a variety of sea bream; a bogue or oxeye.
    • 1859, Albert Günther, “Fam. 7. SPARIDÆ”, in Catalogue of Acanthopterygian Fishes in the Collection of the British Museum, volume I (Gasterosteidæ, Berycidæ, Percidæ, Aphredoderidæ, Pristipomatidæ, Mullidæ, Sparidæ), London: Printed [by Taylor and Francis] by order of the trustees [of the British Museum], OCLC 853056837, page 418:
      BOX. Box (Boops), [] In both jaws a single anterior series of broad incisors, notched at the cutting margin; no molars.
    • 1860, William Yarrell, “The Bogue”, in John Richardson, editor, Second Supplement to the First Edition of the History of British Fishes, [], London: John Van Voorst, [], OCLC 7391853981, page 6:
      The Bogue. [] Box or Boops. Generic Character.—Body elongated, rounded, the dorsal and ventral profiles alike, and the general aspect peculiarly trim.
    • 1862, Jonathan Couch, A History of the Fishes of the British Islands, volume I, London: Groombridge and Sons, [], OCLC 1046521752, page 225:
      BOGUE. BOX. OXEYE. [] In some parts of the European side of the Mediterranean the Bogue is a common fish, and where it frequents it is in great abundance.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ box, n.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 23 August 2018.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Compare “box, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1887.
  3. ^ box, n.(1)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 23 August 2018.
  4. ^ box, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1887.
  5. ^ box, n.(3)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 23 August 2018.
  6. ^ box, n.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1887.
  7. ^ boxen, v.(2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 23 August 2018; “box, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1887.
  8. ^ “Class IV.—PISCES.”, in Illustrations of Zoology. [], London: Published by John Joseph Griffin and Co., []; Glasgow: Richard Griffin and Co., 1851, OCLC 156769589, page 112: “Boops. The eyes of the fish belonging to the genus are very large, whence the generic name from the Greek βοῦς, an Ox, and ὤψ, an eye.”

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs
box

Noun[edit]

box m

  1. boxing (the sport of boxing)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • box in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • box in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m (plural boxen, diminutive boxje n)

  1. speaker, loudspeaker
  2. playpen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English box. Doublet of boîte.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m (plural box or boxes)

  1. stall (for a horse), loose box
  2. compartment, cubicle
  3. garage, lock-up (for a car)
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Noun[edit]

box f (plural box)

  1. Electronic equipment used for internet access (component of the digital subscriber line technology)

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box n (genitive singular box, nominative plural box)

  1. box (container)
  2. (sports) boxing

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English box.

Noun[edit]

box m (invariable)

  1. horsebox
  2. garage, lock-up (for a car)
  3. (motor racing) pit
  4. playpen

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek βώξ (bṓx).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bōx m (genitive bōcis); third declension

  1. A kind of marine fish

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bōx bōcēs
Genitive bōcis bōcum
Dative bōcī bōcibus
Accusative bōcem bōcēs
Ablative bōce bōcibus
Vocative bōx bōcēs

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English box, from Proto-Germanic *buhsuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box (plural boxs)

  1. A cylindrical jar.
  2. A case, container or strongbox.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: box (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: box

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *buhsuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m

  1. box
  2. box tree

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: box, boxe
    • English: box (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: box

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English box.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m (plural boxes)

  1. the curtain or glass panes which separate the shower from the rest of the bathroom; shower stall
    • 2003, Eileen G. de Paiva e Mello, Questão de Tempo, Thesaurus Editora, page 150:
      A mais velha procurava arrancar a cortina do box, pendurando-se nela!
      The oldest one wanted to pull off the stall curtain by hanging to it!

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French boxe.

Noun[edit]

box n (plural boxuri)

  1. (sports) boxing (the sport of)
  2. A kind of sword.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French box.

Noun[edit]

box

  1. bovine leather

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

box

  1. A breed of bulldog.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English box. Doublet of buje.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box m (plural boxes)

  1. boxing (sport)
  2. (motor racing) pit
  3. (sports) box

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

box c

  1. box, crate; a cuboid container

Declension[edit]

Declension of box 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative box boxen boxar boxarna
Genitive box boxens boxars boxarnas

Derived terms[edit]


Zhuang[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tai *boːᴮ (father). Cognate with Thai พ่อ (pɔ̂ɔ), Northern Thai ᨻᩴ᩵ᩬ, Lao ພໍ່ (phǭ), ᦗᦸᧈ (poa1), Shan ပေႃႈ (pōa), Ahom 𑜆𑜦𑜡 (poo) or 𑜆𑜦𑜨𑜡 (peoaa), Bouyei boh.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /po˦˨/
  • Tone numbers: bo4
  • Hyphenation: box

Noun[edit]

box (old orthography boч)

  1. father