cuff

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See also: Cuff

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf
    • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English cuffe, coffe (glove, mitten), of obscure origin. Perhaps from Old English cuffie (hood, cap), from Medieval Latin cofia, cofea, cuffa, cuphia (helmet, headdress, hood, cap), from Frankish *kuf(f)ja (headdress), from Proto-Germanic *kupjō (cap). Cognate with Middle High German kupfe (cap).

Noun[edit]

cuff (plural cuffs)

  1. (obsolete) glove; mitten
  2. the end of a shirt sleeve that covers the wrist
  3. the end of a pants leg, folded up
  4. (informal, plural only) handcuffs
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cuff (third-person singular simple present cuffs, present participle cuffing, simple past and past participle cuffed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with cuffs.
  2. (transitive) To handcuff.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

1520, “to hit”, apparently of North Germanic origin, from Norwegian kuffa (to push, shove) or Swedish kuffa (to knock, thrust, strike). Related to Low German kuffen (to box the ears), German kuffen (to thrash). Perhaps related also to Swedish skuffa (to push, shove). More at scuff, shove, scuffle.

Verb[edit]

cuff (third-person singular simple present cuffs, present participle cuffing, simple past and past participle cuffed)

  1. (transitive) To hit, as a reproach, particularly with the open palm to the head; to slap.
    • c. 1590–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Taming of the Shrew”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i]:
      I swear I'll cuff you, if you strike again.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      They with their quills did all the hurt they could, / And cuffed the tender chickens from their food.
  2. (intransitive) To fight; to scuffle; to box.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      While the peers cuff to make the rabble sport.
  3. To buffet.
    • (Can we date this quote by Tennyson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      cuffed by the gale
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

cuff (plural cuffs)

  1. A blow, especially with the open hand; a box; a slap.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Snatcheth his sword, and fiercely to him flies; / Who well it wards, and quitten cuff with cuff.
    • (Can we date this quote by Hudibras and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      many a bitter kick and cuff

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

cuff (plural cuffs)

  1. (Scotland) The scruff of the neck.