puny

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French puisné. See puisne.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pjuːni/
  • Rhymes: -uːni
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

puny (comparative punier, superlative puniest)

  1. Of inferior size, strength or significance; small, weak, ineffective.
    You puny earthlings are no match for Ming the Merciless!

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

puny (plural punies)

  1. (obsolete, Oxford University slang) A new pupil at a school etc.; a junior student.
    • c. 1610, anonymous, “The Election of the Prince”, in Boas Frederick Samuel, editor, The Christmas Prince, London: Malone Society, published 1923, page 3:
      [] others to make sporte wth all of this last sorte were they whome they call Fresh-menn Punies of the first yeare, []
  2. (obsolete) A younger person.
  3. (obsolete) A beginner, a novice.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)
  4. (archaic) An inferior person; a subordinate.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan, from Latin pugnus, from Proto-Indo-European *puǵnos, *puḱnos, from *pewǵ-, *peuḱ- (prick, punch).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puny m (plural punys)

  1. fist

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]