feble

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fēbelis, from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable) by dissimilation, from fleō (I weep) (akin to fluō (to flow)).

Adjective[edit]

feble (masculine and feminine plural febles)

  1. weak, feeble
    Synonym: dèbil
    Antonym: fort

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: feble

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From older febre, from Old Occitan feble or Old French feble, from Vulgar Latin *fēbelis, from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

feble m or f (plural febles)

  1. feeble; weak
    • 1370, R. Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 613:
      tu coydas que nós somos molleres mãsas et febres cõmo son as outras, et sabe que nós nõ somos taes
      you think that we are meek and feeble women, as the others, but you must know that we are not such
    Synonym: débil
  2. soft
    Synonyms: mol, suave

References[edit]

  • febre” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • febre” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • feble” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • feble” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

febla (weak) +‎ -e

Adverb[edit]

feble

  1. weakly, dimly, faintly, feebly, lightly, mildly

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman feble, from Latin flēbilis.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeːbəl/, /ˈfeːblə/

Adjective[edit]

feble (plural and weak singular feble, comparative feblere, superlative feblest)

  1. Feeble, weak, or strengthless:
    1. Infirm, weak, or frail; lacking physical strength or capability.
    2. Cowardly, nervous, overcautious; lacking willpower.
    3. Unfaithful, unbelieving; lacking religious confidence.
    4. Unthinking, unwise; lacking mental acuity.
    5. Ineffective, weak; lacking power, strength, or magnitude.
    6. Easily damaged, broken, or bent; lacking sturdiness or robustness.
  2. Insidious, iniquitous; morally wrong or erroneous.
  3. Of bad quality, design, or keeping; shoddily constructed or maintained.
  4. Sad, grieving (because of misfortune or bad luck)
  5. (rare, money) Having a low precious metal content.
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman *feblir.

Verb[edit]

feble

  1. Alternative form of feblen

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fēbelis, from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable) by dissimilation.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

feble m (feminine singular febla, masculine plural febles, feminine plural feblas)

  1. weak, feeble
    Synonym: debil

Derived terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *fēbelis, from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable) by dissimilation.

Adjective[edit]

feble m (oblique and nominative feminine singular feble)

  1. weak; feeble

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Catalan feble, from Vulgar Latin *fēbelis, from Latin flēbilis (tearful, mournful, lamentable).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeble/, [ˈfeβle]

Adjective[edit]

feble (plural febles)

  1. feeble
    Synonym: débil

Further reading[edit]