bask

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See also: Bask and bäsk

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse baðask (to take a bath, literally to bathe oneself), mediopassive form from underlying baða (to bathe) + sik (oneself), from Proto-Germanic *baþōną and *sek. Doublet of English bathe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bask (third-person singular simple present basks, present participle basking, simple past and past participle basked)

  1. To bathe in warmth; to be exposed to pleasant heat.
    to bask in the sun
    • 1764 December 19 (indicated as 1765), Oliver Goldsmith, The Traveller, or A Prospect of Society. A Poem. [], London: [] J[ohn] Newbery, [], OCLC 1205185272, page 5:
      The naked Negro, panting at the line, / Baſks in the glare, or ſtems the tepid wave, / And thanks his Gods for all the good they gave.
    • 2021 October 20, Paul Stephen, “Leisure and Pleasure on the Far North Line”, in RAIL, number 942, page 48:
      There will be no problems with visibility, or the highly changeable Highland weather, as Scotland basks in what is reported to be the country's hottest September day for more than a century.
  2. (figuratively) To take great pleasure or satisfaction; to feel warmth or happiness. (This verb is usually followed by "in").
    I basked in her love.
    to bask in someone's favour
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[1]:
      As President Obama turns his attention once again to filling out a cabinet and writing an Inaugural Address, this much is clear: he should not expect to bask in a surge of national unity, or to witness a crowd of millions overrun the Mall just to say they were there.
    • 2011 April 10, Alistair Magowan, “Aston Villa 1 - 0 Newcastle”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      On this evidence they will certainly face tougher tests, as a depleted Newcastle side seemed to bask in the relative security of being ninth in the table

Hyponyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bask m

  1. Basque (person)
  2. Basque (language)

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Iranian *baHjúš (arm), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *bʰaHȷ́ʰúš, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰús. Compare Baluchi باسک(básk), Old Armenian բազուկ (bazuk), Parthian 𐫁𐫀𐫉𐫇𐫃(bʾzwg /bāzūg/).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Central Kurdish باسک‎(bask‎)
Southern Kurdish بازوو(bazû)
Zazaki bazi
Gurani بازوو‎(bazû‎)

bask m

  1. wing
  2. feather
  3. arm
  4. wrist

References[edit]

  • Chyet, Michael L. (2003), “bask”, in Kurdish–English Dictionary, with selected etymologies by Martin Schwartz, New Haven and London: Yale University Press

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

bask c

  1. Basque; member of people

Declension[edit]

Declension of bask 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bask basken basker baskerna
Genitive basks baskens baskers baskernas

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare basa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Rhymes: -àsk

Verb[edit]

bask (preterite baskä)

  1. To wash.[1]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Lindgren, J. V., 1940, “*baska sv. v. 1”, in Orbok över Burträskmålet, page 10