arm

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Arm, ARM, Arms, ärm, Ärm, and Arm.

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

arm

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2/B language code for Armenian.

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint; arm, forequarter), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together).

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. The portion of the upper human appendage, from the shoulder to the wrist and sometimes including the hand.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. He had him gripped firmly by the arm, since he felt it was not safe to let him loose, and he had no immediate idea what to do with him.
    She stood with her right arm extended and her palm forward to indicate “Stop!”
  2. (anatomy) The extended portion of the upper limb, from the shoulder to the elbow.
    The arm and forearm are parts of the upper limb in the human body.
  3. A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.
    the arms of an octopus
  4. The part of a piece of clothing that covers the arm.
    Synonym: sleeve
  5. A long, narrow, more or less rigid part of an object extending from the main part or centre of the object, such as the arm of an armchair, a crane, a pair of spectacles or a pair of compasses.
    The robot arm reached out and placed the part on the assembly line.
  6. (geography) A bay or inlet off a main body of water.
    Shelburne Bay is an arm of Lake Champlain.
  7. A branch of an organization.
    the cavalry arm of the military service
  8. (figuratively) Power; might; strength; support.
    the arm of the law
    the secular arm
  9. (baseball, slang) A pitcher
    The team needs to sign another arm in the offseason.
  10. (genetics) One of the two parts of a chromosome.
  11. A group of patients in a medical trial.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed)

  1. (obsolete) To take by the arm; to take up in one's arms.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English arm (poor, wretched), from Old English earm (poor, miserable, pitiful, wretched), from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armer or more arm, superlative armest or most arm)

  1. (UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Poor; lacking in riches or wealth.
  2. (UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) To be pitied; pitiful; wretched.

References[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Back-formation from arms (plural), from Middle English armes, from Old French armes, from Latin arma (weapons), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-mo-, a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to fit together), hence ultimately cognate with etymology 1.

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. (usually used in the plural) A weapon.
    • 1789, United States Bill of Rights:
      A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      The next thing I laid hold of was a brace of pistols, and as I already had a powder horn and bullets, I felt myself well supplied with arms.
  2. (in the plural) Heraldic bearings or insignia.
    The Duke's arms were a sable gryphon rampant on an argent field.
  3. (in the plural, obsolete) War; hostilities; deeds or exploits of war.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Pubs and taverns often use this word in their names, as a reference to heraldic bearings, e.g. The Queen's Arms.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed)

  1. (transitive) To supply with armour or (later especially) weapons.
    The king armed his knights with swords and shields.
    • 2015, George R. R. Martin, A Dance with Dragons, Bantam (→ISBN), page 593:
      They were arming them with spears and shields, putting iron halfhelms on their heads, and arraying them along the inner wall, a rank of snowy sentinels. “Lord Winter has joined us with his levies,” one of the sentries [said].
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To supply with the equipment, knowledge, authority, or other tools needed for a particular task; to furnish with capability; to equip.
    • 1593, anonymous, The Life and Death of Iacke Straw [], Act I:
      thou getteſt no more of me.
      For I am ſure thy Office doth not arme thee with ſuch authoritie.
    • arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;
    • 1801(?), John Bunyan, The Pilgrim's Progress ... to which is Added, the Life and Death of the Author, page 359:
      Many following him, and, in his journeyings, he visited many at their houses, and gave them consolation, arming them with steady resolves, to be patient in suffering and trust to God for their reward; []
    • 1806, William turner, An Abstract of the History of the Bible ... With questions for examination, etc, page 43:
      [God] directed them to choose out three hundred only, and, arming them with nothing but trumpets and lamps, to send them by night into the camp of the Midianites.
    • 1885, United States Congressional Serial Set, page 119:
      Q. In other words, you were commissioning men here in Cincinnati to attend the polls, arming them with authority to arrest citizens; men from outside of the city of Cincinnati to arrest citizens of the city of Cincinnati []
    • 2011, Meredith H. Lair, Armed with Abundance: Consumerism & Soldiering in the Vietnam War, Univ of North Carolina Press (→ISBN), page 215:
      Picture taking soothed support troops' anxieties twice over, empowering them as they navigated a strange environment, and arming them with proof that they really had served in a war.
    • 2014, Susan Fawcett, Grassroots with Readings: The Writer's Workbook, Cengage Learning (→ISBN), page 466:
      [] and arming them with skills, work habits, and inner confidence that no one can ever take away.
  3. (transitive) To prepare a tool or a weapon for action; to activate.
    Remember to arm the alarm system before leaving for work.
  4. (transitive) To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency.
    to arm the hit of a sword; to arm a hook in angling
  1. (intransitive) To take up weapons; to arm oneself.
  2. (transitive) To fit (a magnet) with an armature.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch arm.

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German arm, from Old High German arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm). Cognate with German Arm, English arm.

Noun[edit]

arm m (plural èrme)

  1. (Sette Comuni) arm
    An langar arm rékhet béetor.A long arm can reach further.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German arm, from Old High German arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor, pitiful). Cognate with German arm, English arm.

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative èrmor, superlative dar èrmorste)

  1. (Sette Comuni, Luserna) poor
    Bèar is arm hat nicht so borliran.He who is poor has nothing to lose.
Declension[edit]

This adjective has irregular declension; positive inflected forms also have umlaut.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “arm” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Luserna / Lusérn: Le nostre parole / Ünsarne börtar / Unsere Wörter [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-mo- (arm).

Noun[edit]

arm c (singular definite armen, plural indefinite arme)

  1. (anatomy) arm
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse armr (arm, poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor).

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. (dated) poor, not rich
    Synonym: fattig
  2. unfortunate, poor
    Synonym: stakkels
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of arm
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular arm 2
Neuter singular armt 2
Plural arme 2
Definite attributive1 arme
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together). Cognate to Avestan 𐬀𐬭𐬨𐬀(arma) and Old Persian [script needed] (arma).

Noun[edit]

arm m (plural armen, diminutive armpje n)

  1. arm
    Iemand kneep in mijn arm.
    Someone pinched my arm.
  2. branch (especially of streams and organisations)
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: arm
  • Javindo: arrem
  • Negerhollands: arm, erm

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse).

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armer, superlative armst)

  1. poor (not rich)
    arme landenpoor countries
  2. poor (unfortunate)
    arme stakker…poor soul…
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of arm
uninflected arm
inflected arme
comparative armer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial arm armer het armst
het armste
indefinite m./f. sing. arme armere armste
n. sing. arm armer armste
plural arme armere armste
definite arme armere armste
partitive arms armers
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Afrikaans: arm
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: arum
  • Jersey Dutch: arm
  • Negerhollands: aerm
  • Petjo: arm

Anagrams[edit]


East Central German[edit]

Verb[edit]

arm

  1. (Erzgebirgisch, intransitive) to work
    Synonym: arbittn

Further reading[edit]

  • 2020 June 11, Hendrik Heidler, Echtes Erzgebirgisch, Wuu de Hasen Hoosn haasn: Das Original Wörterbuch der erzgebirgischen Mundart und Lebensart, Erzgebirgisch - Deutsch, Deutsch - Erzgebirgisch[5], 3. geänderte Auflage edition, BoD – Books on Demand, →ISBN, OCLC 932028867, page 17:

Estonian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *arpi; arm is an irregular variant of the root; the expected arb can be seen in dialects.

Noun[edit]

arm (genitive armi, partitive armi)

  1. scar
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *armo. Most likely derived from armas. Cognate to Votic armo (grace, mercy).

Noun[edit]

arm (genitive armu, partitive armu)

  1. mercy
  2. pardon
  3. (poetic) love, affection
Declension[edit]

Faroese[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of armur

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse) or alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *h₃erbʰ-, whence English orphan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

arm (strong nominative masculine singular armer, comparative ärmer, superlative am ärmsten)

  1. poor (having little money)
  2. poor (to be pitied)
    arm dran seinto have bad luck
    lieber arm dran als Arm abbetter to have bad luck than to lose an arm (the play on words is lost in translation)
  3. low (having a small amount)

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • arm” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • arm” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • arm” in Duden online

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of armur

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm m (genitive singular airm, nominative plural airm)

  1. weapon; implement, tool
  2. (collective) arms
  3. army

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arm n-arm harm not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Jersey Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch arm. Cognates include Afrikaans arm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hāi waz nît tevrêde täus en dârkîs tû râkni arm. [] |He was not content at home and therefore he became poor.

Livonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *armo. Akin to Finnish armo.

Noun[edit]

arm

  1. peace
  2. love

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

Noun[edit]

arm m (genitive singular arm, plural armyn)

  1. arm, weapon, armament

Verb[edit]

arm (verbal noun armal, past participle garmal)

  1. arm

References[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm
Alternative forms[edit]
Inflection[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor, having few possessions
  2. unfortunate, pitiable
Inflection[edit]
Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite arm arme arm arme
Definite arme arme
Accusative Indefinite armen arme arm arme
Definite arme
Genitive arms armer arms armer
Dative armen armer armen armen
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English earm (arm), from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English earm (poor, wretched), from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor
  2. miserable, wretched
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor

Noun[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armer, definite plural armene)

  1. (anatomy) an arm

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse armr m, from Proto-Germanic *armaz m. Akin to English arm.

Noun[edit]

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armar, definite plural armane)

  1. (anatomy) an arm
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse armr, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective[edit]

arm (masculine and feminine arm, neuter armt, definite singular and plural arme, comparative armare, indefinite superlative armast, definite superlative armaste)

  1. poor, pitiful (to be pitied)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]
Further reading[edit]
  • arm (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor
Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Further reading[edit]
  • arm (II)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), whence also Old High German arm, Old Norse armr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm

Declension[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos, whence also Old English arm, Old Norse armr.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. (anatomy) arm
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm

  1. poor, miserable
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Noun[edit]

arm m

  1. arm
Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]
  • Middle Low German: arm
    • Low German:
      • German Low German:
        Hamburgisch: Arm
        Westphalian:
        Ravensbergisch: Ārm
        Lippisch: Arm
        Sauerländisch: Ārm, Ārem, Oarm
        Westmünsterländisch: Arm
      • Plautdietsch: Oam, Oarm

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armoro, superlative armost)

  1. miserable, poor
Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]
  • Low German: arm (also Lippisch)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin armus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er- (to join).

Noun[edit]

arm n (plural armuri)

  1. (chiefly Oltenia) an animal's haunch, or a thigh on a person
    Synonyms: coapsă, șold

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm (arm), from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-mo- (arm).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
  2. arm of the sea
  3. bar, beam

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English arm (poor), from Old English earm (poor), from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative mair arm, superlative maist arm)

  1. poor; wretched
  2. weak; thin; sickly

Verb[edit]

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle armin, simple past armt, past participle armt)

  1. (intransitive) to crawl about miserably.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English armen (to arm), from Old French armer (to arm), from Latin armō (to arm). More at arm.

Verb[edit]

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle armin, simple past armt, past participle armt)

  1. to arm, outfit with weapons or armour

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse armr (wing of a body).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm (plural arms)

  1. (Shetland) the tail end of something, especially of fishing line

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm m (genitive singular airm, plural airm)

  1. army
    Synonym: armailt
  2. arm, weapon

Usage notes[edit]

  • Arm is usually used to refer to the entire fighting force of a nation etc, while armailt usually refers to the an "army" involved in a particular battle etc:
    Arm Bhreatainn anns a' Chogadh MhòrBritish Army in the First World War (the armed forces as a whole)
    armailt Bhreatannach ann an AfragaBritish Army in Africa

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arm n-arm h-arm t-arm
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “arm”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “arm”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish[edit]

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos.

Noun[edit]

arm c

  1. (anatomy) arm; the body part
  2. arm; something extending from a body
Declension[edit]
Declension of arm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative arm armen armar armarna
Genitive arms armens armars armarnas
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse armr (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ormos.

Adjective[edit]

arm (comparative armare, superlative armast)

  1. (dated) poor; to be pitied
    Synonym: stackars
  2. (dated) poor; with no possessions or money
    Synonym: fattig
Declension[edit]
Inflection of arm
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular arm armare armast
Neuter singular armt armare armast
Plural arma armare armast
Masculine plural3 arme armare armast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 arme armare armaste
All arma armare armaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Yimas[edit]

Noun[edit]

arm

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN) (as arɨm)
  • William A. Foley, The Yimas Language of New Guinea (1991, →ISBN), page 296:
    arm tark kantk-rm ima-na-tɨ-n
    water coldness with-water water S-DEF-becomes-PRES
    'The water is getting cold.'