armature

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See also: armaturé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French armature, from Latin armātūra (armour). Doublet of armor.

Noun[edit]

armature (plural armatures)

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  1. The rotating part of an electric motor or dynamo, which mostly consists of coils of wire around a metal core.
  2. The moving part in an electromechanical device like a loudspeaker or a buzzer.
  3. A piece of soft steel or iron that connects the poles of a magnet
  4. (sculpture) A supporting framework in a sculpture.
  5. A protective organ, structure, or covering of an animal or plant, for defense or offense, like claws, teeth, thorns, or the shell of a turtle.
  6. Armor, or a suit of armor.
  7. The frame of a pair of glasses.
    • 2014 June 24, “Google Glass go on sale in the UK for £1,000”, in The Guardian:
      It can take pictures or video from a front-facing camera, controlled by a voice command or a swipe on the right-hand armature, and is designed to display at-a-glance information on its screen which is visible only to the user.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

armature (third-person singular simple present armatures, present participle armaturing, simple past and past participle armatured)

  1. To provide with an armature (any sense).
    • 1940, Waldo David Frank, Chart for Rough Water: Our Role in a New World, page 147:
      T. S. Eliot had his legion of followers: the immaculate minor poet armaturing in exquisite technique a mildewed softness, and living a reminiscent universe which never existed.
    • 1985, Frederick S Clarke, Cinefantastique - Volume 15, page 48:
      "Armaturing to the larger size was just another challenge we had to face," comments Bruce.
    • 1996, Mrinalini Devi Sharma, Energy Conscious Earth Architecture for Sustainable Development:
      This essentially implies that a wide overhang and waterproof foundations are needed, and the material itself is treated by compaction, alloying or armaturing.
    • 2011, Darold A. Treffert, ‎Daniel Tammet, Islands of Genius:
      Alonzo knew instantly how to armature his horse figures, by using some self-fashioned wires, to capture the real-life motion of his stallions. Armaturing is a skill that takes some artists years to master.
    • 2012, Phil Wallace Payne, The Strivers, →ISBN:
      Good telling of happenings—fact or fiction—has talents in the tale. Beginning and end must strive to armature these.



French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin armātūra. Doublet of armure, which was inherited through Old French.

Noun[edit]

armature f (plural armatures)

  1. framework (supportive structure)

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

armature f

  1. plural of armatura

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

armātūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of armātūrus